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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 222 (some duplicates have been removed)
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm EST
for nelson mandela. >> he passed on peacefully. >> near midnight in johannesb g johannesburg's president announced the death. world leaders joined forces. in america our first black president spoke of his shehero,e first black president. >> he no longer belongs to us, but by the ages. >> to his county he represented forgiveness. >> you have a limited type of to stay on earth. you must try to use that period for the purpose of transforming the country in what you desire it to be. a democratic nonracial, non-sexist country. that is a great task. >> hello, i'm antonio mora, welcome to a special edition of "consider this". the man known as madiba said courage was not the absence of deed. born to a royal tribal family naming him rolihlahla dalibhunga, which means trouble maker, he lived up to his name. after studying law he dedicated himself to apartheid. a system imposed on the black african. nelson mandela was arrested in sentenced to life in prison. he spent 28 years behind bars, mostly in a tiny cell on robin island near cape town. nelson mandela's brutal imprisonment led to tub
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 12:00am EST
are watching al jazeera's special coverage of the death of nelson mandela. people all over the world mourning the death of the man they called madiba. these are the feeds coming live from johannesburg, outside the home of the south african antiapartheid hero. this is where he decide last night surrounded by his family. crowds of we'll wishers have been gathering, dancing, swimming, praising his life. they are there to celebrate his achievements and mourn his passing. nelson mandela, south africa's first black president was 95, dying in the company of his family after a long battle against lung infections. let's listen to what some of these people had to say gathered outside his home. >> i'm very sad. i met him when i was young. i grew up with him. i was very sad. i'm not happy that he gets to rest in piece. what he did for the country. i was telling my friend now, that if i was him i wouldn't be friends with him. i wouldn't be together. . >> obviously i'm shocked and sadden. it's hurtful. i was born in 1994. he fought for everything. i wouldn't be able to be here around my family. i
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 11:00pm EST
, freedom fighter, hero for change and hope. the world celebrates the life of nelson mandela. >> he no longer belongs to u he belongs to the ages. >> nelson mandela said it, "it always seems impossible until it's done", for this towering revolutionary who spent decades in prison for believing in freedom and equality nothing is impossible. the world is a better place because of him. the former south african president died at his home. he was 95. outside crowds gathered all evening and in the morning and have been gathered four hours to mourn his passing, but to rejoice in a remarkable life. scenes are incredible, people dancing and singing. they are paying tribute to him. they are doing the same in new york. a famed venue in harlem, and the marr key honours nelson mandela. morgan radford is here in the studio. >> talk about the life of nelson mandela, and what he means to so many people. >> nelson mandela is a symbol of hope, freedom, a time in this world, and in our country and theirs when equality did not s did not reign free and is a symbol for young americans growing up understandin
FOX News
Dec 5, 2013 5:00pm PST
quote i don't know whether you are away. >> i was, yeah. >> 95 years old. nelson mandela -- i spent some time in south africa. he was a communist, this man. he was a communist. all right? but he was a great man. what he did for his people was stunning. the sacrifices that he made. he could have repudiated and got out of that prison. he wouldn't do it. he was a great man. but he was a communist. so, but i would never attack
LINKTV
Dec 6, 2013 5:30am PST
inspire generations. nelson mandela has died at the age of 95. thank for joining us on "france ." people around the world are gathering to mourn the loss of nelson mandela. this friday everyone from heads of state to people on the street are remembering mandela, who was both inspirational and controversial. and ray brown looks back at the life of nelson mandela. born in the former trance state territory on july 18, 1918, nelson mandela was meant to become a tribal chief like his father. instead he became a lawyer and the first -- in the first lack legal practice in johannesburg. he joined the congress in 19 -- in -- in his practice, he was exposed to the inhumanity's of apartheid on a daily basis. he decided to fight back. opting for nonviolence as a strategy. he was first arrested in 1956 and prosecuted on treason charges, which were later dropped. nancyars later he married winnie.s when he -- >> there are many people who feel it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against the government. on these savage attacks. on unarmed, defenseless peopl
NBC
Dec 5, 2013 5:30pm PST
for the one hour special edition of nightly news on nelson mandela. it is 3:30 friday morning in front of the home of nelson mandela. n of freedom who changed the world. >> in the name of the heavenly father of our people -- >> tonight the world reacts to the death of nelson mandela at the age of 95. >> he's now at peace. >> on our broadcast tonight, remembering the man and his legacy. "nightly news" begins now. >>> the death of nelson mandela from nbc news headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >>> good evening. to those who loved him, he was the hope and the light of the world. nelson mandela has died at the age of 95. while this news, this announcement was inevitable, it has still come as a shock to the world with the realization that a beacon of freedom and moral authority and dignity and forgiveness is now gone. a former prisoner turned nobel laureate. late today local time in south africa after visible worry and activity outside the home, south african president zuma went on live it's and broke the sad news to his country. >> our beloved n
NBC
Dec 5, 2013 7:00pm EST
people. >>> tonight the world reacts os the death of nelson mandela at the age of 95. >> he is now at peace. >> on our broadcast tonight, remembering the man and his leg si. "nightly news" beginnow. >> announcer: the death of nelson mandela from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >>> good evening. for millions who lived him and the modern country he formed and >>> in the modern country he formed and the light of the world, he was the hope around the world, nelson mandela died at the age of 95. while this news was inevitable, it has still come as a shock to the world a realization a be don of forgiveness is gone. a nobel prisoner turned nobel laurea laureate, for so many years, a giver of peace. late this afternoon after visible activity and worry outside the mandela home, south african president went on live television and broke the news to his country. >> fellow south african, our beloved nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation has died. >> the news was followed by president obama at the white house. >>
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 12:35am EST
" nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >> good evening and thanks for joining us. nelson mandela's face is one of the most recognizable in the world. and tonight in south africa this symbol of racial equality died at the age of 95. from boxer to advocate, prisoner to peace prize winner, seemed mandela was always fighting for a cause greater than himself. it's clear that his legacy as a champion of human rights, equality and freedom will be forever etched in our minds and memories. >> like so many around the globe, i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. and so long as i live, i will do what i can to learn from him. >> to celebrities and mostly ordinary citizens of the world, an outpouring of love and mourning. we are live in johannesburg. alex? >> good evening, dan. a new day has dawned here in south africa. a profound sense of loss has swept across this country. but what's remarkable are the scenes of celebration that we see. south africans going out in the streets. >> when the news broke tonight of mandela's death, south africans flocked to his
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 12:00am PST
nelson mandela, who survived 27 years in prison, and led south africa out of the nightmare of apartheid, and beacones to serve as a for anyone who values justice and equality. his battle against retaliation set a standard to which all of us should aspire. belafonte,is harry maxine waters and larry king. thank you for joining me on my tribute to nelson mandela, starting now. >> there is a saying dr. king said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life doing the right thing. we are halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have a lot of work to do. spending over $1 billion to fight hunger in the u.s.. if we were together we can stamp this out. >> and by contributions to your pbs stations, from viewers like you. thank you. ♪ tavis: please to be joined now by harry belafonte, a longtime friend of president and della. an advocate for justice and equality in his own right. i met with him in new york city to talk about nelson mandela's great contributions to the world. envious and jealous of you for so many reasons, not the least of which is that handsom
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm PST
them to you right hire. now it's time for the last word. >>> nelson mandela told his biographer men come and go, i have come, and i will go when my time comes. nelson mandela's time came today. >> i pledge to use all my strength and ability to live up to expectations. i am your servant. i don't come to you as a leader. >> nelson mandela has departed this earth at the age of 95. >> the founding president has departed. >> the day he was released from prison gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided by their hopes and not their fears. >> na is the man the world has been waiting to see, his first public appearance in nearly three decades. >> the basic issue is the demand of one person, one vote. >> nelson mandela has become a philosophier king, setting out his vision of what he thinks the future of south africa should be. >> prison is just not a place. >> we will likely not see the likes of nelson mandela again to make decisions by love, not by hate, to strife for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. >> it is not the individuals that matter. i am your ser vant
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 1:00pm EST
>> announcer: this is al jazeera. ♪ >>> hello welcome to the news hour, in doha, i'm adrian finnegan with the continuing coverage of the life and death of nelson mandela. south africans remember the man who lead them out of white-only rule. >>> i'm barbara in london, remembering mandela in europe. the statesman who touched a generation. [ gunfire ] >>> in other news, france s more troops to the central african republic a day after violence left more than a hundred people dead. a cash for work scheme is winning praise for cleanup after typhoon haiyan. >>> we begin this news hour then with the dae of nelson mandela. the president of south africa addressed the country to reveal details of theno carrierringrin0 [ technical difficulties ] >> and thank you for making south africa what it is today. nelson mandela inspired millions of people to reconcile and forgive. in the coming days they will honor his legacy and memory as they begin to prepare to say good-bye. >> so the state funeral as you said next sunday december 15th. south africa won't have seen a state occasion like it. and with so many world leaders flying in, it is likely to be a logistical nightmare. >> yes, it is. but they have no choice but to make it work, and they have been playing for a long time. nelson mandela was 95 years old, and he became sicker and sicker, so people knew this day was coming, people were planning this, so most people would expect the government had soming kind of plan in place and the plan will work. to the average people, though, for them, i think it's just how they are going to remember nelson mandela. for the parents here with children, they say they want to bring their children here, because they want their children to remember who nelson mandela was. and for some they don't even know who nelson mandela was. the young ones don't understand what he did for this country. and by bringing their children here, they are hoping their kids will learn and spread the message of peace and reconciliation and tolerance. >> all right. let's here now from tony leon, the former leader of the opposition democratic alliance, mandela's political foe. >> i often, you know, used to think about, well, is this man an angel or a bit of a [ inaudible ]. the answer is probably a bit of both. because he -- he knew his opponents weak spot and he knew how to seduce you with amazing amount of charm and persuasion to get the position that he wanted and if you stood up to him, as i had to do sometimes, he never seemed to regard that as a particular front, and i think that the way mandela operated certainly was present in the anc, was to provide influence people that he was on the right coarse. and if you weren't persuaded that was fine as well. so i always think of him as someone who didn't know his opposition as a club or a shield, he used it to try to unite the country. at our first meeting after he became president and i was elected leader of party in may 1994. he asked me to have breakfast in cape town, and he said, you know, toni, the opposition must hold up a mirror to the government. and we might not always like what we see in it, but that is a democracy. and he was pretty true to that. if you [ inaudible ] on certain toes of his organization, he was none too happy, but i think in the main he lived up to the ideals that he set out for the >> nelson mandela leaves a lasting legacy across the africa continent. let's hear from malcolm who has been speaking to a uganda journalist. >> we are outside of uganda's sports stadium. it was built in 1997 and it was named after nelson mandela. mandela visited uganda on several occasions, the first time was in 1990, just months after he had been released from prison. this man worked as a journalist in uganda for many years. >> it was euphoric. it was every single person in the country could tell that there was something in the country that had never been there before, that was nelson mandela. >> what in your view was nelson mandela's legacy? >> that person who had any other means of survival could fight the racism in this country, spend 27 years in prison and come back and not revenge on the people that emprisoned him, that i think for me that [ inaudible ] should not happen if we follow the legacy of what nelson mandela stood for. >> about half of the current population wasn't even born when nelson mandela was in power, but his ideas, visions and legacy live on. >> nicholas is in the capitol where people also revere mandela. >> this is one of the main arteries here, and it is named after nelson mandela. this road leads to this building, the national assembly. it's more than a symbol. it's a tribute to those who look for peace and dialogue before violence and conflict. wh nelson mandela came here in 1962 for the first time. and he came to get support - support -support -- [ technical difficulties ] >> here he is revered just like everywhere else in the world. he came here and went straight to an aland where slaves were taken to the americas, and that's where we were told he stayed in one of the holding cells alone and wept. and that resinated to the people here. today here like everywhere else in the world is a day of mourning and remembrance. >>> many world leaders have been giving their reaction. here are some of those. >> when he was released from prison it gave me a sense of >> we must carry so that [ inaudible ]. >> and we are not likely to see another of his kind for a long time to come. >> he also made us understand that we can change the world. we can change the world by changing attitudes, by changing perceptions. >> translator: he was a great leader who fought with strong will to eliminate apartheid. >> participate nelson mandela lived an troeshgsd their life in a very ordinary way. >> translator: it's really a very big shock for us. i compare him to a big [ inaudible ], a great tree under which everyone takes shelter. >> nelson mandela was convinced that hatred and are venn j cannot make the world a better place. >> one man [ inaudible ] force has shown he is stronger than all armies. >> tonight one of the brightest lights of our world has gone out. [ applause ] ♪ >>> well, as we continue to remember nelson mandela, we want to hear from you. if you have any pictures of yourself with mandela, or personal memories that you would like to share, please drop us at line. we'll share your stories and many others throughout the week. ♪ >>> the dno carrierringringno c0 >>> but that could be jeopardized. al jazeera reports now. >> it's a lifeline for those living hand to mouth. government subsidized ration shops like this across the country, help the poor buy affordable basics. without this help, people like this man would be unable to feed themselves or their family. he is a laborer, and earns 81 usd a month. >> we rely on food subsidy if it is taken away, i will not be able to survive. i'm the soul wage earner, i have four children and they are all studying. it costs a lot. >> protecting the poorest in society and access to cheap food. the food security act guarantees that right for as many as 600 million people. this is the indian's government worry at the conference in indonesia, worried that a welfare program to give cheap food to 600 million people will contravene the new rules. >> can bebarter away a compromise when it comes to a fundamental right to food security. i would like to make this absolutely clear that we have not come here as petitioners to beg for a peace clause. >> reporter: four years ago when food subsidies were threatened farmers came to new delhi to event their anger. now the pressure is on india and up to 30 other nations to come into line and cut the help they give to the farming industry and poor consumers. the program could cost the government $20 billion u.s. dollars a year, and it's far above the current limit net by the wto. the talking has continued through the night to try to confirm the agreement. india is wondering what the agreement means for them and an already week global economy. >>> in the philippines the recovery effort is still plainfully slow almost a month after typhoon haiyan hit. but there is a movement to get the local economy moving again. >> reporter: there's very, very little left on the store like at tacloban, this man knows that too well. he is a fisherman, or rather he was, given that his boat now sits a couple of kilometers inland. >> translator: before i was earning about 300 pesos a day from the catch. but now i don't earn anything because what i catch is what we eat because i don't have boat. >> reporter: his story is replicated thousands of times across tacloban. so the challenge after the emergency aid phase is to get people working and let the local economy take over again. every street in tacloban is an absolute mess and they need cleaning up, which means you have ready made jobs, which is why you have up to 20,000 people lining up to take part. >> even if they are cleaning their house, we give -- we pay them. our point is that if every one of them are cleaning up tacloban, we can revive it, and then they are able to buy things. if you go to the market, you can see there are a lot of things for sale. immediately the economy has been reviveded. >> reporter: pretty much everywhere you go here, you uncover little success stories. sometimes it's just someone who owns a restaurant, a place to gather at a tough time. these are the people who won't let their city die. >> i have to look for the regular suppliers of our drinks, of our meat, vegetables, that kind of stuff. i thought to myself, maybe we could just start offering one or two of our regular menu. >> reporter: the can do attitude, perhaps the only thing that could triumph over adversity such as this. >>> all right. lots more still to come here on the news hour. we'll have reaction from havana to the death of nelson mandela. and world cup debutantes because nia prepare for a difficult match. the details in around 20 minutes. >>> hello again, adrian finnegan here in doha. our top stories. ♪ >> south africans have been celebrating the life of nelson mandela, and tributes are being paid word wide, the 95-year-old icon died in his home on thursday. he'll be laid to rest in a p private ceremony on december 15th. leaders from 40 african nations are meeting in paris to discuss military intervention. more now on the death of nelson mandela. we have a former campaign manager for the south african leader. he joins us live from new york. thanks for being with us. having worked so closely with nelson mandela i can understand today must be a particularly emotional one for you. what memories of him are foremost in your mind right now? >> i mean right now i'm thinking about the election period because that was when i spent the most amount of time with him. and he was an incredible man. we would be out campaigning and his security would be trying to keep him away from the hordes of people and he would break every security rule in the book and make sure he could touch and speak to as many as he could, particularly the children. and in the last four months of the campaign, he probably spoke directly to more than 2 million people across the country. the former president said he found mandela's lack of bitterness astonishing. what are we to make of that lack of bitterness? and what are you able to tell us about the relationship between the two men, declerk and mandela? >> i think the lack of bitterness and mandela's focus on reconciliation are well documented. he was the kind of leader that was ten steps ahead of everyone else. he had the foresight to put behind the past and rebuild the country. but there was a wonderful moment in the election campaign. i think mandela deep down had a deep dislike for de[ inaudible ] but understand he needed him as a partner. we encouraged him to be negative and attack declark, but in the middle of the interview he attacked him quite vigorously. and in the last minute of the interview, he says both of us are leaders of this country, we're going to have to work together. and he put his hand physically out, and declark had no choice but to take his hand. so i think it was sort of a bitter-sweet relationship. >> without him and his attributes, would the country do you think have descended into civil war? is this >> absolutely it would have. i think it happened sort of a year and a bit before the elections when a very senior and prom meant leader was murdered and if it wasn't for mandela calling for calm that was the time the country was ready to explode. and i think his ability to get people to calm down and get them to be focused on the future was an incredibly contribution, without which i think the country could have easily gone off of the rails. and we miss that quality in south africa today, but he did what he needed to ensure a successful transition. >> thank you very much. >>> we continue to get reactions from around the world. let's hear from daniel who is in the cuban capitol havana, one of the places nelson mandela headed for after his release from prison. >> that's right, and i think the news of his death has a big impact here. president castro spoke expressing his sympathy with mandela's family, talking about the great ties there have been between the two countries. after castro came to power, he expressed unity with nelson mandela and supported the anti-apartheid campaign with cuba sending troops fighting against the apartheid troops -- the troops sent from the apartheid south africa. and nelson mandela after his release from prison, thanked fidel castro for that support, saying it was fundamental to weakening the regime. he came to visit fizzle castro soon afterwards. and i think there was also a very personal bond between the two apparent when you look at the old video of the two men together. there seemed to be a mutual respect expressed. very strongly felt here in cuba. flags at half mast and official day of mourning to mark his death. >> daniel thanks indeed. >>> loads of social media reaction to the death of nelson mandela. for all of that, let's join "the stream" in washington, d.c. >> hello, we have been covering nelson mandela's death using traditional media, and there is so much going on in social media as well. mandela's passing as become one of the most discussed topics in twitter history. each of the orange dots represents a mention of mandela happening in real time. so if you are tweeting his name right now your tweet will be sented on this map. i'm going to bring in the producer of "the stream." >> right. this is an incredibly global scale. you showed the map of it happening in real time. what i'm going to pull up on my screen here is the trending hashtags from right before the announcement of his passing to about four hours later. now this starts at about 1900 gnt. this is a map of what people were tweeting. it starts off with no hashtag, but over the course of four hours the dominant hashtag explodes. one of the biggest was madeva, referring to nelson mandela's tribe name. >> the kids all have a picture of nelson mandela, and that's in india. and so many other countries are looking and memorializing nelson mandela. are there themes? >> i'm glad you mentioned india. we talked about how brood of an impact he had. what i'm pulling up now is one of the hashtags we saw in spanish. elsewhere in arabic, of course . . . and we even have one here in french, we lost a universal hero yesterday. in addition to that, there are pictures. >> of course. >> because online is known for that. >> right. >> here is one i'm showing out of london. >> let me take you on a journey. we're going to start in south africa in johannesberg. and this shows you some of the tweets she hasn't touched upon. in johannesberg that's the home city of nelson mandela. and then to the uk, this is wooster. that is an essential part of the uk, and into new york, and again, people are tweeting and memorializing nelson mandela there. so it's amazing how a black south african and his life is resinating around the world. we're getting a sense of some critique of how people are memorializing nelson mandela from the united states.o cf1 o >> right. mr. don twitter writes in . . . elsewhere prince tweets in . . . so we need to remember that also people are saying. >> there is one more place i want to take you to see where the trending hashtags are and the instagrams as well. have a look at this. ♪ >> what was basically done in the last couple of minutes is have been curecurerating for you. and my final go-to place is the al jazeera blog spot. live blogging from all of the news coverage that we're doing here. that's a look at the social media impact of the death of nelson mandela. >>> the death of nelson mandela has touched communities all around the world. in the uk ordinary people are remembering the impact he had on their lives. >> we just saw a picture from outside south africa house on twitter, and that's because many of the anti-apartheid cers fled to london, and it was an issue at the heart of the political awakening of a generation. >> while hundreds have been gathering outside south africa house here in london, site of so many protests in the '70s and '80s. lawrence lee has more. >> reporter: left wingers used to be held to abuse for holding protests. now it's a shrine. people arriving to talk eagerly about what nelson mandela meant to them. this man produced what was clearly a treasured souvenir, his head just peaks from the background during nelson mandela's visit in the 1990s. >> he taught us as much about ourselves as much as how we should treat other people. but that time -- i always say this is the sort of greatest moment of my working life was that day. >> because you saw mandela. >> yeah. it is. i have never this ever since. >> for people born after the 1990s, it is difficult to explain what mandela meant. it is precisely because the iniquity of apartheid was proso easy to understand, but mandela's generation helped whole groups of people understand what it was like. and people got judged on what their attitude was towards south africa and the anc. mandela help millions and millions of time set a moral campus about what they thought about the world. ♪ >> and because apartheid was so easy to understand rebel against anthems like this one were sung across all universities for years and years. would they choose to put the money in a bank with links to the south africa governments? would they support mu musicians who played music there. >> margaret thatcher used to describe mandela as a terrorist. most people would say nowadays that that puts her on the wrong side of history, and those who formed the anti-apartheid movement so many years ago are the ones being congratulated now. >> our former headquarters in london, it was the anti-apartheid movement that [ inaudible ] congress. >> some people say the struggle was supposed by so many in britain, because of white post colonial guilt. maybe that's true, but perhaps a lesson for the future as well as a story from that past. >>> let's bring youment some other news from europe now. at least seven people have been killed by hurricane-force winds and tidal surges. thousands of homes have been left without power, and flights, rail, and ferry services have been canceled. in eastern england thousands of homes were evacuated. >> reporter: it's one of the fiercest storms to have hit europe in years. it blasted its way towards the mainland. people were warned to stay in doors and avoid the worst of the weather. especially at risk were the large freight ships sailing through this trade route. as the hurricane made its way across the uk, lifeboat crews rescued people from their homes. devastation inside isn't it? >> low lying areas were at risk of tidal surges. there were fears that flood defenses would not contain the held up. >> there is that combination of the investment in infrastructure, and then giving people warnings ahead of time. evacuationed coordinated by the police and local authorities. that team work has made all of the difference. ar part of the coast hasis escaped the worst of the surge, but it's not completely out of trouble yet. there is a surge expected again on friday night, and it could cause some limited damage in the area. this was the worst surge the eastern coast had experienced in 60 years. such incidence are rare in this region, but it's low enough to make many living here consider this home. >>> ukraine's president has arrived in russia for talks with vladimir putin. the pair have been discussing how to lay the foundations of a new strategic partnership. but once again people are on the streets of kiev. let's cross live to kiev and speak to our correspondent, tim friend. tim the people demonstrating there want the ukraine to have closer ties with europe rather than russia, so they are not going to see this meeting too kindly, are they? >> no, they are not. they are aiming for a million people out on the streets this weekend on sunday, the biggest ever crowd to have gathered here in independence square. as you say they want closer ties with the european union. they see that as their savior, because frankly, the economy here is in a terrible mess. but the ukrainian president has towards moscow for help, and this new meeting, this further meeting with president putin, there have been several over the last month or so, is highly controversial. can russia afford to bail out ukraine? that's the real question people are asking here. and of course it has been played out in ukraine, but it's an international row as well. some of the western european leaders have been out here, meeting the demonstrators, offering them support insofar as its peaceful, and of course, russia sees that as people making trouble in their own very, very controversial, and will, perhaps, lend the protesters here even more anger as they go into this weekend of protests. >> there are a lot of issues at play, aren't there, tim, for example from the former prime minister, who the eu think is facing charges because of politic political reasons. we have heard for more delays in the trial, haven't we? yes. she didn't turn up in court today. she has back problems and her health is an issue. and one of the stipulations with the european union was for her release to have medical treatment outside of ukraine, and she is never far from controversy here in kiev, and the current president sees her as an arch enemy of course, if she had been released, that might have been seen as a sign of weakness, and so she very much is at the center, still of this debate. >> tim friend live for us in kiev. tim thank you. the world cup. here is farah. >> thank you so much. the groups for the 2014 world cup in brazil have been drawn. our reporter has been following the draw in brazil. what has been the initial reaction to who brazil have drawn? >> well, the brazilians seam pretty happy as you might imagine. they are going to open against croatia in their home of sal palo, and as mentioned mexico, which is a team that always poses a certain threat but has certainly struggled to get into this world cup, and then cameroon, ranked only 59th in the world, but still a lot of experience for the cameroon team. the brazilians are feeling pretty good about this first draw. if they get past that first round, and that's certainly what nose brazilians are expecting, things could get much more difficult very fast. it could get very difficult, very quick for the brazilians. >> and people have been traveling all over the country for group games. are the fans worried that that will effect how they play? >> well, for the brazilians, not really. they are going to be in sal palo, that's only a 45-minute flight from their home base. and so they are not too worried about the travel. they kind of know what to expect. i think the big travel issues will be for some of the other teams. especially england that has to open up from an over two-hour flight. but for a lot of the other teams they certainly are worried about it. brazil is a country almost exactly the size of the al united states. >>> all right. let's take a look at group b. columbia, greece, ivory coast and japan make up group c. group d is looking like one of the tightest. uruguay, england, and italy. switzerland, ecuador and honduras are in group e. iran and nigeria are other teams in group f. also in group g are ghana and the united states, and group h includes belgium, algeria, russia and south korea. let's go to seioga now, and what is the reaction from because nia's group? the >> well, in the first place there wasn't much speculation about which group would be good to get, and which group would be bad to get, because the excitement for being there was so huge, that whatever group you get would be kind of good enough. so if you get a weaker position you get more chances to going through. if you get stronger position, it could more difficult. argentina is lead by the greatest football player of our time. >> all right. thank you so much for now let's hear from former england international mark. let's start with england. they are in a pretty tough group, aren't they? this >> it was a bit of a -- moment when the draw came out. we know all about the south american sides. and then we have got italy to notoriously good at this kind of competition. let's hope they have a slow start when we play them in the first game. >> and spain versus netherlands, a repeat of the last final. is the spain team as strong as they once? >> well, you have two really top, top coaches. i think it could be tied this year. i think you look at the players that will be playing for spain, all going to champions league, all long seasons, then they have the travel climate to play in. i think for spain i would expect them to get to the knockout stages, but i think this could be a world cup for far too many. and group g who is any stand out there? >> well, g for germany. they always get their teams to perform. the consistency, the scoring goals. they have their all-time leading goal scorer playing for them, and it's a german's side that is packed with players, so that says it all, i think. >> and mark i want to know what the secret to success is. >> not to lose your first game. if you come away without losing in in the first game then you have the on if ied dense to build on. if you lose your first game you through all of your onions into one pot. you need to go into the second game with something on the table. >> okay. thank you so much for joining us. >>> there's a dedicated section of the draw on our website, check out aljazeera.com/sports. >> thanks. more news straight ahead here on al jazeera. tÑ >>> welcome to al jazeera america. i'm steph steph. here are the stories we're following for you. outside his home in south africa. a spontaneous tribute to nelson mandela, how he changed that country and beyond. a step in the right direction for the u.s. economy, a new report reveals the job picture is rienthing and unmroement is falling. a severe wind and ice storm is moving east. hundreds of thousands are without power, and travel problems are building. ♪
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 12:00pm EST
thanks for watching. >>> welcome bah al jazeera america. i'm stephanie sy here are the stories we're following for you. >> god thank you for the gift of [ inaudible ]. thank you for watchi watching -- letting us know we can become. >> across the globe people are celebrating the life of nelson mandela. >>> a new report reveals the jobs picture is brightening, and unemployment is falling. >>> and a major ice storm sweeps across the country, cutting power and delaying travel. >>> across the world people are remembers nelson mandela. there is mourning. but also celebration for the life of a man who changed a nation and became a global icon by sheer force of character. there will be public remembrances for the next week and a half culminating in a state funeral. nick reports from johannesberg. >> reporter: for south africans today is for mourning. madeba as he was known widely was the father of this country. >> somehow we believe that [ inaudible ] but we'll have to accept the humble request of [ inaudible ] to come together and mourn. >> reporter: he might have been sick for a long time, but people here are still shocked. they have lost a revolutionary leader. >> even though one knew that this day would come because of his age, there still is a huge sense of loss, a deep sense of emptiness. >> reporter: in a black village about 30 miles from here where he and his wife lived young and old, white and black remembered his generation of spirit. >> i'm just glad he did all he did for us, and hopefully we continue the legacy as the youth and the remaining africans. >>> president obama joined leaders around the world in mourning the death of nelson mandela. the white house says the president and the first lady will travel to south africa to at ten the state funeral. the two met in 2005 when obama was a senator in illinois. the president travelled to south africa in june but he was too ill to meet with mandela. libby casey joins us now. >> gratitude and so much remembrance has come pouring in from all over washington. president obama recalled how as a young man he was first inspired to political action back in college by going to an anti apartheid rally. and he talked about the role model that mandela. the president yesterday remembered his words that nelson mandela said he wanted to see an ideal, a society where there was democracy and freedom for all. >> nelson mandela lived for that ideal, and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and said he has gone home. and we have lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> remembrances also come in from past presidents. stephanie? >> and libby several members of congress also expressing their admiration for mandela. >> i don't think there's one member of congress we haven't heard from. and also people taking inspiration from his political role. john boehner put out a statement today and yesterday that said this . . . nelson mandela addressed joint sessions of congress back in 1990 and 1994, and while all of the outpouring of praise is so positive then, back then it was controversial to some. a couple of members of congress k a wally boycotted his speech. it took an act of congress to go forth because president reagan tried to veto sanctions. they called the anc a terrorist organization. however, democrats and republicans came together and imposed those sanctions as it was seen as a point of leverage trying to put some economic pressure on south africa to cf1 oapartheid and free nelson >> some real complexities there. libby casey thank you. ♪ >>> some encouraging news for jobs and the economy today, patricia sabga has the details of the much better than expected november employment reports. >> reporter: for the second straight month the u.s. job market showed signs of improve. the economy added 203,000 jobs in november lowering the unemployment rate to 7%. labor secretary says the numbers indicate the economic recovery is gaining strength. >> we have now had 45 consecutive months of private sector job growth to the tune of 8 million plus jobs. roorp while the numbers are encouraging, analysts say we still have a long way to go? >> to get to full employment we estimate the economy is going to have to create between 200 and 225,000 jobs per month for the next couple of years. >> reporter: but that may be difficult to achieve. the recovery is still on shaky ground with small businesses sees a slowdown in sales for the year. that is significant, because those businesses create about two-thirds of new jobs. ly hard hit has been the retail sector. despite slashing prices and opening their doors thanksgiving day, retailers posted disappointing sales in november. >>no carrierringringno carrierr0 [ technical difficulties ] >> trying to get a flight, because most of their flights were canceled. 330 fights from airlines out of dfw have canceled today. american airlines have canceled a thousand flights across the country. outside of the airport, again, pretty treacherous driving conditions we have had. one fatality, a number of pile ups and fender benders. it's one of those days where the department of transportation says if you don't have to drive, please don't. teachers and students will get a three-day weekend out of this, but otherwise there is not a way to put a happy face on this day. >> mike snyder at dfw, thank you, mark. >> stephanie this system is very large. it extents not only across texas and also into arkansas but also into portions of the northeast where the rain is coming down right now. it's this rain that is going to switch over to snow and freezing rain later tonight. you can see it stretching across the virginias. but let's make our way further into the south into arkansas where we're going to have to continue to deal with freezing rain during the day. the rain is going to switch over to snow in upstate new york later today. we could see anywhere from 4 to 8 inches of snow. major differes between memphis and atlanta. freezing rain coming down along the roadways and folks are highly -- not encouraged to drive at all. stephanie back to you. >> coming up your top business headlines plus more on that icy storm causing massive power outages and travel problems. and we continue to honor the life and legacy of the great nelson mandela. here are some of the sentiments shared by current leaders from around the world. ♪ >> our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. >> we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. >> he also was a great debater. his mind was sharp at 70 as it was at 40 it seems. >> nelson mandela was not just a hero of our time, but a hero of all time. a man who suffered so much for freedom and justice. >> he touched our lives in deeply personal ways. nelson mandela showed what is possible for our world, and within each one of us, if we believe mean can walk together for justice and humanity. >> he passed on peacefully in the company of his family. he is now resting. he is now at peace. ♪ >>> some of the headlines from around the world there. welcome to al jazeera america. i i'm stephanie sy. mandela inspired people around the world. in london mourners have gathered outside of the south africa embassy. phil ittner joins there live now. phil many people have a strong connection with nelson mandela. what has the reaction been like there? >> well, stephanie, the reaction has been significant. it -- the -- the folks here in this line at the south african embassy, waiting to sign a book of condolences despite the chill into the air and having gone into the evening hours, they are still lining up. we have had a number of dignitaries here as well, including the mayor of london, and of course prime minister david cameron came to sign the book, and he took some time out to mark the historic nature of this day. >> tonight families across britain will mourn with his family and everyone in south africa. your greatest son has moved millions, and i believe that his inspiration for the future will be every bit as powerful as the extraordinary things that he achieved in his remarkable life. >> reporter: stephanie generally the mood here has been of a mixed one. ment some of -- you know, some sadness, obviously, but a lot of celebration, marking the achievements of nelson mandela. >> he lived a long life and i know there are a lot of south africans there in london. phil ittner thank you. >> now let's take a moment to catch up on some of the top business stories making business today. the bulls are back in the driver's seat today. two iconic companies are being looked at by government regulators. they are investigating the finances of jcpenney, and officials are checking the accounting practices of barnes & noble. >>> sears is shedding another one of its business. it will spin off its lands end clothing line into a separate company. >>> even with today's positive employment numbers, about 11 million americans remain out of work. but since the great recession, women have fared better than men in fining results. as a result some women are opting to stay single and financially independent. >> reporter: marian got married at 16, left her husband at 19, and she has beenlying on her own ever since. wanda was married and then divorced a few years later. neither regrets being single now. >> i like to provide for myself. i'm not going to depend on a man. >> i don't think that i would have stepped out as boldly and been as successful had i still been married. that's kind of sad to say, but i think that's true. >> these women reflect two striking trends in america's family profile. the marriage rate has fallen sharply. divorce has become more common over the same period. marian and wanda also represent the economic disparities among american women. they haven't been used in in probably the past 30 or 40 years, and now they are going to be developed into affordable housing. successful, one-person business in construction and housing development, marian has just gone back to work after kicking a long-term drug hab it. >> it was hard especially for a person that was an addict trying to be employed and just living a rough life my whole life. >> marian is among the four in ten women who's income falls below the government standard for economic security. but for women like wanda that's not a big concern. >> i would have loved to have done this while i was married and have had a sense of security from that, but i don't feel insecure in what i'm doing. >> and neither sees a new man in their future, yet. >> i'm not focused on that right now. >> i have found peace in in ways of prayer or meditation. >>> nelson mandela was a passionate sports fan and he actually trained to be a boxer. still ahead, how mandela used one venue to bring people together and spread his message. Ñ >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. here are today's headlines. as the world mourns nelson mandela's death, south africa is preparing for his funeral. the 95-year-old anti-apartheid leader died yesterday at his home in johannesberg. mangd will be buried following a state funeral on sunday december 15th. the white house says the president and the first lady will travel to south africa to at ten his funeral. >>> the u.s. economy added more than 200,000 jobs in november. the unemployment rate dipped to 7%. it's lowest point in five years. >>> back to our top story and a bit of information that not everyone may know. nelson mandela was a passionate sports fan. he trained to be a boxer and understood the name of the game. he once said that sports has the power to change the world, the power to inspire and unite people in a way that little else does. and last night, the nba paid tribute to nelson mandela with a moment of silence. >> i remember as a kid my parents -- he was the one person who when you hear his name everything stops. he gets the ultimate respect from everybody. >> i think thing that sticks out about him is here he goes to jail for 27 years and comes out aet -- a better person, a better leader, and was able to make a sure difference in south africa. >> tiger woods and his late father earl had the privilege of meeting nelson mandela back in 1988. he said that mandela's aura had a lasting impact. >> he certainly had an impact on my life and certainly my father, and i think that time frame in which he came out, could have -- the country could have fallen apart, and he lead it to where it's at now, and, you know, he -- and the world is going to miss him. >> and in 1995, nelson mandela used the world cup of rugby to unite a racially divided south africa. he also brought the world cup of soccer to south africa in 2010 which is the biggest event in sports, something that would have never happened without him. he said that sports had the power to change the world, and he proved it. ♪ >>> we continue to see ice falling across portions of dallas-fort worth up to memphis, tennessee and little rock arkansas. we urge folks to use caution. we could see additional ice. we have warnings in this effect until 9:00 tonight. >> thank you for watching al jazeera, i'm stephanie sy. "the stream" is next.
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 12:35am PST
on ♪ ♪ >>> tonight on a special edition of "nightline." nelson mandela. freedom fighter, leader, a symbol of racial equality. the man who changed his country and the world has died at age 95. tonight, we're live on the ground in south africa. from his long walk to freedom -- >> tonight we have only one guest, nelson mandela. >> -- "nightline" was there. >> to spend so many years at the prime of your life is a tragedy. >> how a young boxer fought his way through nearly 30 years in prison to become his country's first democratic elected president. >> he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. >> don't call me. i'll call you. >> to his magnetic sense of humor, mandela was loved by everyone. from world leaders to celebrities. when he visited the u.s., areeth that franklin sang to him. tonight she's with us sharing her special memories only on "nightline." >> this special edition of "nightline," nelson mandela, a man who changed the [s[man] no one told her,right?a. [son]hi! [mom screams] >>> this is a special edition of "nightline." nelson mandela, a man who changed the world.
CNN
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm PST
>> hello again, welcome to our special cover annual of the death of nelson mandela. >> welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. >> it is morning now in south africa. crowds have gathered outside the former president's home in johannesburg, he died peacefully on thursday, he was 95. >> mandela is known for freeing south africa and delivering it into the hands of democracy. president jacob zuma broke the news of his death. >> our thoughts are with the millions of people across the world who embraced mandela as their own and who saw his cause as their cause. this is the moment of our deepest sorrow. >> well, millions of people around the world are joining south africans in mourning the death of nelson mandela. let go live now to johannesburg. robyn curnow who has covered nelson mandela's career extensively. i guess the fact that he hasn't been president for 14 years him he has so many people out in the stheet streets. he remains in their hearts on this day. >> reporter: absolutely. you know, nelson mandela's life mirrored south africa's struggle for political
CBS
Dec 6, 2013 4:00am PST
>>> i cherish the idea. so help me god. >> remembering nelson mandela. the anti-apartheid activist and south african former president dies at 95. this morning he's being remembered as an icon of human rights. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. captioning funded by cbs >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for friday, december 6th, 2013. good morning. good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. well, this morning nelson mandela is being remembered for his resolve and ability to forgive, traits that helped peacefully end the brutal segregationist policy in his native south africa. south africa's first black president died yesterday at the age of 95 following a long illness. he was surrounded by his family. mandela's fight against apartheid made him an inspiration to millions, including president obama. >> i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison, he gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided by their hopes and not by their fears. >> when mandela died, crowds gathered throughout south africa to mourn his death and celebrate his life. debora patta is in johannesburg with the latest. debora, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, anne-marie. well, i'm outside nelson mandela's home. they woke up to the news he had died. it came as no surprise because his health has been very, very poor for six months, but it still has the power to shock and sadden. his health has been critical but over the past few days it got even worse, prompting his wife graca machel to summon the family to his bedside and in this home they were able to say their final good-byes last night. but the story of his life is really being told on the streets here. rich and poor, young and old, black and white are gathering, some to sing, some to cry. i just saw a white housewife with her black domestic worker, madam and servant, walking arm and arm, sobbing uncontrollably, a fitting legacy to a man whose entire life, his enduring legacy, is one of reconciliation and frillness. forgiveness. his body was taken to one military hospital in pretoria last night and it will lie in state for public viewing and then be flown to his rural home for a private family burial. that's about a two-hour flight from johannesburg, and that is undisclosed to take place in about ten days. anne-marie. >> debora patta in johannesburg. thank you very much. >>> well, mandela went from prisoner to president becoming one of the great presidents of our time. cbs news anchor scott pelley has more on nelson mandela's remarkable life. >> reporter: he was born on july 18, 1918. his mother named him holy sizwe meaning troublemaker but later a school teacher renamed him nelson. he moves to johannesburg at the age of 23. nelson became one of the first black lawyers and joined the opposition african national congress in the early 1940s devoting himself then to peacefully ending apartied. then in 1960, 69 peaceful black demonstrators were killed by white south african police in the infamous massacre. mandela came to believe that the only recourse then was violence. >> we feel that it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against a government who is on these savage attacks on unarmed defenseless people. >> reporter: he was arrested in 1962 and later sentenced to life for sabotage and conspiracy. he spent most of his time on robben island, the alcatraz of south africa. he said nelson mandela never let his spirit die. >> he worked on the premise that he would live to see the victory. he accepted that he may not live to see the victory, but he did not doubt that the freedom struggle would triumph. >> reporter: mandela was imprisoned for 27 years. then on february 11th, 1990, at the age of 71, he walked free. cbs news correspondent bob simon covered his release. >> reporter: the mandela limousine was a beat up toyota. the motorcade had to change plans several times because the approaches to cape town were jammed. >> reporter: arches by on desmond tutu said prison made the man. >> the fully robust and aggressive young militant became a generous understanding person. >> i cherish the idea of the new south african where all south africans are equal. >> reporter: in 1993 mandela and the south african president who freed him, f.w., de klerk shared the nobel peace prize and a year after that, mandela became south afri africa's president. >> let there be justice for all. let there be peace for all. let there be work, bread, water, and salt for all. let freedom ring. god bless south africa. i thank you. >> reporter: nelson mandela chose to serve only one term. in the end he came to personify struggle, a political prisoner who became president and saved his south african nation. >> he could so very easily have led our country down the road of retribution and revenge, and we would have been up a creek. >> reporter: author maya angelou knew mandela since 1960. >> nelson mandela represents the best any of us can hope for. he was a great man, and i'm grateful. the world is better for having him. >> reaction to mandela's death is pouring in from around the world. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. susan, good morning. >> good morning, anne-marie. the tributes have been coming in all night long from leaders around the world and other officials, including here in washington. the people of america join south africa today in mourning the passing of nelson mandela. south africans sang and danced outside nelson mandela's home in johannesburg. the outpouring began in the middle of the night when word spread that the man they called mandiba, which means father, had passed away. >> i'm happy he gets to rest in piece. >> reporter: mandela spent 27 years in prison because he fought against apartheid, south africa's system of legalized racism. but as archbishop december monday tutu noted this morning, mandela forgave those who imprisoned him. >> this one has become the global icon symbol of reconciliation. >> upon his release, mandela would go on to become south africa's first black president in 1994. >> he built a genuine multi-racial democracy in south africa. when he could have had the politics of resentment, he chose the politics of inclusion. >> years later he would become the man that would become the world's first black president. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profound lie good human beings that any of us will share good times with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> not far from his house, the morners gathered outside nelson mandela's statue outside the embassy. >> we try to prepare ourselves, but it's not that easy. >> flags at the white house and other federal buildings will fly at half-staff in honor of mandela through monday. now, many see the most striking aspect of nelson mandela's legacy as this extraordinary capacity for forgiveness, that with no bitterness, he embraced those who held him captive and thereby brought about this unification of south africa, and made him a hero for all ages. anne-marie? >> susan mcginnis in washington. thank you, susan. >>> well, nelson mandela left the south african presidency in 1999. his life has been portrayed in several movies. one, "mandela: long walk to freedom," had its london debut last night just as mandela passed away. prince william and the duchess of cambridge were attending the premiere. >> it's extremely sad and tragic news. we were just reminded of what an extraordinary and inspiring man nelson mandela was, and my thoughts and prayers are with him and his family right now. >> reporter: the audience didn't learn of nelson mandela's death until after the movie was other. the movie producer explained his daughters wanted the premiere to go on. we'll have much more on nelson mandela's life coming up on "cbs this morning." >>> now, to other news. millions of americans are facing another big blast of winter-like weather, and the national weather service is also issuing storm and ice warnings from texas to tennessee. some parts of the midwest are expected to see several inches of snow. the storm is also bridging bitter cold to a wide swath of the eastern half of the country. >>> schools in dallas and ft. worth are closed today and residents are being told to stay home. they're calling today ice friday. sleet and freezing rain are coating roads, making travel dangerous. a fleet of dump trucks is spreading sand on highways. >>> coming up on the "morning news," a murder mystery in benghazi. an american teacher shot dead in a libyan city. this is the "cbs morning news." . teacher shot dead in a libyan city. this is the "cbs morning news." . but jim has afib, atrial fibrillation -- an irregular heartbeat, not caused by a heart valve problem. that puts jim at a greater risk of stroke. for years, jim's medicine tied him to a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but now, with once-a-day xarelto®, 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[ male announcer ] so indulgent, you'll never believe they're light. 100-calorie progresso light soups. >>> here's a look at to forecast in some cities around the country. new york, expect rain today with a high of 52. miami will be sunny. chicago will be cloudy. windy with sleet in dallas today. los angeles, sunshine. >>> on the "cbs moneywatch," key jobs numbers, and a money mixup at mcdonald's. alexis christoforous is as the new york stock exchange with that and more. good morning, alexis. >> good morning, anne-marie. the financial world is paying particular attention because a strong jobs report could spur the federal reserve to pull back on its economic stimulus program. the economy has added an average of 202,000 jobs a month from august to october. the unemployment level stands at 7.3%. indications that the fed may cut back its economic stimulus sent stocks lower on wall street. the dow jones industrial average lost 68 points, its fifth straight day of decline. the nasdaq fell 4 points. asian markets were cautious ahead of the u.s. jobs report. tokyo's nikkei gained nearly 1% and hong kong's hang seng added a fraction. >>> general motors is pulling most of its chevrolet brand from europe. most chevy sales in europe will end by the beginning of 2016. gm says it will concentrate its european sales efforts on its german made opal brand. they'll offer the corvette throughout europe. >>> and fast food workers demonstrated for higher wages yesterday. protests and work stoppages were held across the country. the effort to raise the minimum wage to $16 an hour began about a year ago led by the service employees international union. >>> and when a tennessee couple ordered breakfast at mcdonald's, drive-through, they got bucks instead. greg and stacy terry found three bags filled with money. it turned out the restaurant's deposit were mistakenly put in their takeout bag. you can imagine a very upset employee caught up with the terrys. he explained the situation. the money was happily returned. you've got to admit, big returns on your big mac situation. >> indeed. that's my kind of dollar menu or at least $20 from what i could see there. alexis christoforous at the new york stock exchange. thanks a lot, alexis. >>> when we return, more on the life and contributions of nelson mandela. a look at how the human rights leader used sports to inspire others. 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[ girl ] make dinner pop! african president had here the bay area. it's a crime that s baffled investigators for decades. the disappearance of a paci woman may finally be solved. and an investigation is now underway into google's e in the san francisco bay. what a bay area commission.s looking into. join us for kpix 5 news this morning... beginning at 4:3 ,,,, >>> here's a look at today's forecast in some cities around the country. washington, d.c., rain and 59. atlanta, afternoon thunderstorms. there will be snow in st. louis, but it will be sunny in denver and seattle today. >>> florida state quarterback jameis winston will suit up when his team plays for the acc championship on saturday. a prosecutor declined to file sexual assault charges against winston saying there were too many gaps in the accuser's story. the accuser and her family have been critical of investigators after the announcement they released a statement saying her experience will, quote, discourage other victims of rape from coming forward and reporting. winston released his own statement saying he's relieved that he will be able to continue his education at florida state. >>> and in the nfl, two teams moving in different directions meet on thursday night. jacksonville, winners in three of their last four games, hosting houston, losers of ten straight. the jaguars used some trickery. ace sanders catching a lateral pass and throws it to jordan todman for a third quarter touchdown. the jags win, 27-20. >>> finally, nelson mandela once said sport has the power to change the world. as a young man, the human rights leader was an accomplished amateur boxer. a year after his historic election as south africa's first president was credited with bringing his nation together at the world cup final which south africa won. he got to host the2010 world cup. the first time that tournament was ever held in africa. and he was known for inspiring athletes across generations. boxing legend muhammad ali had this to say about mandela. he was a man whose heart, soul, and spirit could not be contained or restrained by racial and economic injustices, metal bars, or the burden of hate and revenge. >>> coming up after your local news on "cbs this morning," worldwide reaction to the dealt of nelson mandela. i'm anne-marie green. this is the "cbs morning news." this is the "cbs morning news." 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[ male announcer ] pillsbury crescents. make the holidays pop. >>> here's another look at this morning's top stories. the world is mourning and celebrating nelson mandela this morni morning. the world's app tie apartheid leader died yesterday at home following a long illness. mandela was 95 years old and when word of his dealt was announced crowds started to gather across south africa. this morning mourners gathered at his home and at memorials around the country. mandela will be bury at his ancestral home in about ten days. >>> well, this morning nelson mandela is being remembered as a fighter for human rights and equality and he says the most powerful weapon for change is education. as jim axelrod reports, that message inspired generations of american students and teachers. >> reporter: when nelson mandela visited madison park high school in roxbury, massachusetts, in 1990, the crowd went wild, eager to hear his words of wisdom. >> the youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow. >> reporter: cele celestino dep was a sophomore in the gym that day. >> the youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow, and at the time that was a quote that really stuck to my head and to this day i try to instill the same concept in my students. >> reporter: mandela's speech was a turning point in depina's young life. he decided he, too, wanted to lead from the classroom as a teacher. >> okay. the word "freedom," but freedom is not free. >> reporter: now he's a history teacher at brighton high school in boston, hoping to be a role model in a school where more than one in ten students drop out. born to poor immigrant parents in the west african nation of cape verde, depina knows well barriers to a child's success. >> i use my hardships as a motivation. today as an educator, i tell my students, well, don't use your personal issues as an impediment for not coming to school and not succeeding in school. as a matter of fact, use that as a motivation because later on it will pay off. >> reporter: depina says the words in life of one of africa's greatest elders will long inspire. >> and this is the person i was talking about, nelson mandela. he has paved the way for others, and i think that cycle should only continue if you want to have a better world. >> reporter: many will remember how nelson mandela changed the world, including one kid in the bleachers who was moved to try to do the same one classroom at a time. >> there's no easy walk to freedom anywhere. >> reporter: jim axelrod, cbs news, boston. >>> coming up after your local news on "cbs this morning," special coverage on the death of nelson mandela. we'll take you live to johannesburg. >>> plus, reaction from the white house. we'll hear from former secretary of state colin powell. >>> and we'll look back at some memorable moments from charlie rose's conversation with nelson mandela. that's the "cbs morning news" for this friday. i'm anne-marie green. have a great day. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com and i'm frank mallicoat time is 4-- here's >>> good morning, everyone. it's friday, december 6. i'm michelle griego. >> thank god for that. >> hi, everyone. i'm frank mallicoat. time now nearly 4:30. and a little bit on the dl here but we're going to make it. >> you sound great. >> sexy gruff sounding voice. >> i'll take that. >> all that cold air got you a bit. it's freezing again in parts of the bay area. down to 23 degrees now in santa rosa. 26 in napa and 27 in livermore. got a chance of some rain coming our way. we'll talk about that coming up. >> and outside we go a lot of the overnight roadwork was picked up by 4:00 this morning. this is a live look at the san mateo bridge. things look good towards the peninsula. >>> well, this morning, the world is mourning the death of nelson mandela. the former south african president died yesterday at the age of 95. this is a live look at a memorial outside his home. hundreds gathered to leave flowers, pray and celebrate his life. >>> reporter: south africans woke up to the news
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 4:00am EST
. nelson mandela, a guiding force, reve revered, forever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people. and to millions around the world. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. ♪ >>> and this morning, the world wakes to news of a giant of human and civil rights gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force for millions, revered for forever changing history. >> she spent nearly three decades in prison, becoming the first black president in south africa. father figure to millions around the globe. >> people around the world are remembering nelson mandela, a symbol of forbearance, peace and dignity. we have pictures from south africa, where people have been celebrating the former leader's life, by chancing through the streets overnight. >> alex ma
NBC
Dec 6, 2013 4:00am PST
icon as news spread of nelson mandela's death. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> this friday morning we'll take you to south africa and look at the man who spent so much of his life behind bars. yet, his words and actions continue to have a profound impact around the world. >>> in other news this day, much of the u.s. bracing for a major winter storm with snow, ice, and plunging temperatures. "early today" starts right now. 45 4556>>> good morning to you. i'm richard lui. he is known for changing the world. people around the globe mourning the loss of nelson mandela. from a small prison cell he empowered a nation. his humility helped to revolutionize south africa. >> his tireless struggle for freedom gave him the respect of the world. >> his journey to president embody the promise that human beings ask countries can change for the better. >> we should have the same type of spirit and caring of the people and as a n
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 2:00am PST
of a global icon as news spreads of nelson mandela's death. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> this morning we'll take you to south africa and look at the man who spent so much of his life behind bars, yet his words and actions continue to have a profound impact around the world. >>> and in other news, much of the u.s. braces for a major winter storm with snow, ice and plunging temperatures cutting across the country. >>> good morning. i'm ma ra schiavocampo. he's remembered as a man that changed the world. nelson mandela being mourned around the globe today. from a small prison cell, he rallied a nation. his long walk to freedom inspired hope in millions and his humility helped to revolutionize south africa. >> his tireless struggle for freedom earned him the respect of the world. >> his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> we should
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 8:00pm EST
antiapartheid leader. this as scene outside the family home. early in the morning, now nelson mandela the first president of south africa has died surrounded by his wife and family. he was 95. from there around the world, people are paying tribute to the freedom fighter. i was with him in his home. >> which is where i met mr. mandela when i was with jesse jackson. >> what was that like. >> this is a man whose mind is so sharp. in that in his voice, hello. are you happy to see me today. i said i am sir, i am here to see you today. he was eating breakfast, and reading newspapers in four different languages. reading in zulu, reading in english, it was really remarkable. how sharp his mind was, if i can only be that sharp at that age. >> clearly, when i look at a picture like that of you, and this group that had come to see nelson mandela. >> his life was pretty great then. >> obviously, you weren't around when a lot of the bad things happen. >> you are showing my age, john. i think yo are showing my life. as i mentioned to you elier, this was very symbolic especially because he is from a tri
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 7:00pm EST
african president.h it is 7:00 p.m. eastern time here in new york, 2:00 a.m. in johannesburg where mourners are gathering. they are celebrating the life of south africa's first democratically elected president. you looking at the scene. a man who became a towering symbol for civil rights for strength, for unity. >> days to come, we will bring you extensive coverage, detailed coverage of his life, president obama spoke about mandela minutes after his death was announced, here is what he said. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us to be the example he set, to make decisions guarded not by haste, but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make. strive for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. >> . >> right now let's pause and give thanks the r the fact that nelson mandela lived, a pan who took history, in his hands. bent the arc of the moral universes towards justice, may god bless his memory, and keep him at peace. >> the president of the united states, again, live pictures in outside nelson mandela's home tonight, and here in new york, a live picture of the apollo theater, the same the venue in harlem, tonight the marque honors nelson mandela. here is a picture of the marque, we are getting ready for a live shot. we have consider spot don'ts automobile across the united states and the world. we also have guests hire in the studio, right now my colleague is here, talk a little bit about the incredible significance of this man, and what his passing means in. >> absolutely. john, i was in that home in south africa, in johannesburg, and this is really a moment of self-definition for the country. >> why is that? >> because they have a lot of reforms they are still trying to work there. first is poverty. you a large majority of the country that is still living in rural areas and they are living below the line. which is one reason why the current president is a symbol figure because he has the education of a 6th grader and he was a sheep herder. which mandela -- is a smaller group of black africans and it is a tribal clan that has produced nelson mandela, becky, but zula is a zoo loo leader. and this is a moment where black south africans are trying to reclaim the south african identity, and he was a symbol of their inclusion. >> this is going to a week celebration, at least, for nelson mandela, and i think that -- there was some who thought maybe they would wait until the morning to announce his death. >> but they didn't wait, and it is very -- as we with can see, it is the 2:00 a.m., and the crowd has just begun to get started. days of celebration. >> this is a very african way of celebrating life. and they are just beginning to redefine, and define his legacy, and what it will look like for years to come. for example, his grandson who is a close friend of mine, he is becoming the mandela campaign. which is is a foundation of rend braking the image of africa. you also talk about indians in south africa, explain. >> mandela is the symbol of contemporary nonwhite. >> it is where gandhi got his inspiration for leading a peaceful nonviolent protest. and so india and south africa really do -- as a very personal symbol of progress in the country, and independent. >> i just want to get a little it into african-americans in the quite and the effect it will have on them as well. >> there is a huge community of expates african-americans living in south africa currently. and they very much see the opportunity in south africa as being unmatched. many of them when they spoke to me said you know, this is like 1960s america. and i wasn't alived to see 1960s america personally, but they told me that the opportunity, and the ground, the landscape for opportunity in south africa is unmatched and unparalleled. and they think they can see progress in south africa, that they feel like has maxed out in terms of growth. >> all right, we are going to come back to you, and get more insight on this incredible event, and what will be coming in the next few days, morgan, thank you. we want to go to the white house now. mike, take it away. >> john, i don't think it is too much to say, the life, the times the struggles of nelson mandela have resonance in the very presence of the white house. there's the obvious point that his father is from the same continent. ed. >> the first time that president obama had ever spoke to a public audience. was on campus on this very issue. the president spoke very elegantly very somberly, he has met nelson mandela, just one time, it was here in washington, in 2005, he traveled to south africa several times, 2006, he went to robin island, where nelson mandela spent the bulk of his 27 years of incarceration. he was there with his family this past june, he wasn't able to see nelson mandela, obviously because of his failing health. let's listen to more of what the president said when he appeared in the briefing room. >> at his trial in 1964, nelson mandela close add statement from the dock, saying i have fought against white domination, and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony, and with equal opportunities. it is ran ideal which i hope to live for, and to achieve. but if needs be, it is an ideal before which i am prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal, and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. food he has gone home. we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and good human beings that any of luis share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. >> it is difficult to overstate the influence and inspiration that he had on president obama. i'll read a little bit more, the president said i cannot fully imagine my life without his example. nelson -- the example nelson mandela set, so long as i live,ly do what i can to learn from him there's one episode that the president had come back to, president obama, and that is when he finally was released from jail, in an event that ultimately vaulted him to be the leader of south africa, he did not seek revenge, he did not secret tri-bias, he embraced those that jailed him, to reconcile with those that jailed him, was an inspiration to him. let me ask you a question, do we know anything about the president's schedule, and whether we may be traveling to south africa? >> we do expect the president to travel to south africa for the funeral, the attribution on this is a little dicey, but we can say that is probably effective. >> leaders around the world are reacting to the death, and at there are plans for a great celebration funeral and david is here to talk about that, david? >> yeah, the official state -- is going to come on day nine, this is a ten decor yoking fewed that they have been working on for a long time, in fact, it started today. where his body was taken to an undisclosed mortuary, starting tomorrow, the government will place condolence books in embassies all over the world, as well as government buildings all throughout south africa. on day three, there will be formal invitations that will be issues to world leaders. such as the leaders of including the former president george hw bush, and george w bush, anybody that serves on the world stage will get their invitations on day 3, and then starting on day 5,dy. four is a logistical day, when you will see the first public funeral, and it will happen at the soccer stadium, where they held the world cup in 2010, 94,000 people, you can imagine the kind of long lines will be just for the public to get into the state memorial service. nelson mandela's body will be moved. on day seven, that's when his body will lie in state. and then undawning and then finally on day 10, is when things ram up with the private family burial. so every day there will be pictures and opportunities for the world to express its condom lenses and grief and this is the initial planning. well, each day is pretty much firm. they are fearful that the number of clouds and logistics coordinating so many wormed leaders is not something that south africa may have been preparing for. they anticipate it, but coordinating is nothing like they have seen since the death of i don't think kennedy. >> more on nelson mandela's life. >> he was a prisoner, and a president. a violent revolutionary and a moderate reformer, he was the face of change, in turbulent south africa. his smile, and his frank powerful weapon in the fight for racial and political equality. >> many people don't see it, that it is useless for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence, against the government -- he is on these salvage attacks. on an unarmed defenseless people. >> the black mane that would lead away from racial separation and minority white rule was born in 1980 teen. he grew up in a rural roadless area near the south eastern coast, born to tribal royalty, he was adopted and raised by a chiefton after his father's death when he was just nine. he was the first in his family to attend school. he stepped down and joins a boycott over conditions at the school. he moved to johannesburg, studied law and joined the african national congress, a political party and resis tent movement fighting the segregation that was so devicive in south africa. those divisions brew even sharper. complete racial separation the resettlement of 3 million people to black homelands. denying they right to vote and travel. themson mandela was only 30. he soon became convinced peaceful demonstrations would never be enough to uproot the oppressive racist structure. so he helped form and run an armed grill ha movement. a campaign of bombings and sabotage in the early 60's, led to his arrest and prosecution. along with others in the movement. >> convicted by spare as death sentence, he would send a quarter of a century behind prison walls. 18 of those at the notorious robin island. outside the fight only grew more fierce, the oppression and the violence focused the word on the racism. boycotts choked off the economy, mandela became the most famous prisoner in the word. the off international condemnation and growing domestic unrest chipped away at apartheid until finally mandela was released from prison. it was february 11th, 1990, the streets flowed with joy. and the man who had become a powerful symbol of resistence, walked free. >> vowing never to go back to what he called the black held of apartheid. >> i have spoken about freedom in my lifetime. your discipline, your commitment, has lift me to stand before you today. but freedom wasn't easy, to reform the government has to play peace keeper trying to temper escalading violence between his party and supporters of the freedom party who wanted no part of negotiations with the government that had helped them down for so down. thousands were killed. also his marriage to winny mandela, a powerful political force herself was crumbling. the woman who supported him so publicly, was accused of having affairs and some of the murder rouse violence. they finally divorced. through it all, in 1994, he was able to vote for himself, in a free election. he won, and was inaugurated as the first black president of his country. your hard work to elect a president of your choice. >> he served one term, leading reformed in child healthcare, modernize the infrastructure and pushing for racial healing. while his close relationships with foreign leaders drew some criticism, he still visit the white house a number of times meeting with three sitting american presidents. in 2002, george w bush presented him with the presidential medal of freedom. barack obama met mandela only one in 2005, when obama was still a senator. nelson mandela. >> when south africa hosted the world cup tournament in july of 2010, he made his last major public appearance at the final games. the crowd honoring him with a thunderous ovation. >> never, and never agai again, shall it be will gain the experience, the oppressive, of one by another. and suffer the indignity of things to some of the world. >> signing up the effects are so glorious, a human achievement. god bless africa. in 1990, he visited new york and nearly 100,000 people gathered in harlem to hear him speak. tonight, outside the apollo theater, marque honored nelson mandela, that's where jordan martin is standing by, what are you hearing tonight? >> first john, it is pretty evidence you can see the marque you just mentioned it says in memory ol' nelson mandela, he changed our world. a lot of people here in hair held, and in new york in general remember when he came here, actually the marque was a big part of it. it said welcome home mr. and mrs. mandela. there were a huge crowds here, more than 100,000 people, there was a huge parade. a lot of people we spoke to today found out about his death as they were leaving work, and seeing this marque. and for people here, his sit sit brought a bit of hope. a lot of people remember him riding by is pointing at the apollo theater. he just mentioned how his visit game hope. people just appreciated him making the stop, when he could have stop sod many other places. so certainly sadness, and a lot of fond memories coming from the people that were here those years ago. so jonathan -- what else is expected -- are there any events expected to happen at the apollo tonight? >> well, not tonight, like i said -- you just have started here. people are finally just stopping by, many people sharing memory as lot of people have stopped by to speak to us, and say i remember back in 1990 that we were standing -- we were here on top of the marque. some people remember being -- really at this point no sort of planned memorial, or anything, if you will, just a lot of people here sharing fond memories. but i am sure there are some things in the work. >> in harlem tonight, jonathan, thank you. there's been reaction from around the world, and we want to read some of it to you. bill clinton released this statement. history will remember nelson mandelaar a champion for human dignity, and freedom, for peace and reconciliation. >> president clinton said we will remember him as a man of uncommon grace and some passion, and embracing adverse say, not just a political strategy, but a way of life. president clinton posts a photo of himself with mr. mandela on twitter, for his millions of followers. and former president georgeh.w. bush was in office when mandela was released from prison. barbara and i had great respect for president manage della, and send our condolences to his family and countryman. former president george wildcats bush, and former first lady laura bush are among those expressing their condolences. they release add statement that read, president mandela is one of the great forces for freedom, and equality of our time. he bore his burdens with dignity and grace, and our world is better off because of his example. this great man will be missed, but his contributions will live on forever. let's go to ray swarez live in washington, d.c., with more from washington. ray? >> you know, john, listening to those tributes from former american presidents, you have to remind yourself that it wasn't such a clear thing to american leaders that nelson mandela was a hero. or a leader of any kind. he was widely referred to in the 60's, 70's, and 80's, as a terrorist by some american elected officials. there was a great deal of reluctance on the part of the ragan administration to allow sanctions to go ahead as the world began to coalesce in opposition to apartheid government. so it was only when congress had a veto proof majority, that sanged war able to go ahead late in the second term. it wasn't all together clear to oh people that nelson mandela was a hour row, or that he should be released and allowed to lead a free south africa. when you look back at the history, and ronald ragan, and the prime minister, and the world terrorist being use inned the same breath as nelson mandela, it is hard to remember those times. because he is so beloved and the point of view has changed so much. talk about toward and his relationship? >> well, he recognized that a lot of the power, and late in the antiapartheid movement, a lot of the money that spurred that movement ahead, came from the united states. and while he had many detractors here in america, he also had many supporters and he recognized that a free south africa would need the support and the help of the united states both officially, and from its people in organizations and organization contacts. to succeed is in the era of liberation. he bulled off a very interesting trick. he had been supported during his long captivity, by many leaders who were persona in the west, people like muammar gaffe dad few, yasir arafat. and when it came time for liberation, he never turned his back on those men. an interesting show, but also a canny, strategic way of thinking about the future of this country. he became the brand of a new rebranded south africa. >> all right, ray swarez, thank you very much. the celebration continues just beginning as you can see in the live pictures. tonya page is standing by, with more on that, tonya? >> yes, we have been here for several hours and really i think we are hearing the opening verse of what will be a long song of tribute we will hear played out over the coming days. people come together, really choosing at this moment to celebrate the life of nelson mandela. mourn his passing, of course, an event that millions of south africans knew it was coming, they didn't know when, a bit of. >> a outpouring of emotion, and they are really remembering him. and the life and the legacy, and the gift that he gave the sacrifice he gave for this country. people of all walks of life, all religion i don't knows, all colors and ages gather here. this is the south africa that nelson mandela dreamed of. >> talk a little bit about -- south afterdan people were so protective of nelson mandela, especially in his final days and now that his death is finally come there's so much planned after his death. what is is expecting in the coming days. >> . >> the military possibles are not saying exactly which one. notified by now of a need to make their plans in order to get here, in time for the funeral. they will be lying in state, which at the moment is supposed to only be one day, and that will be before opportunities to see him, to pay their respects in person after which his body is supposed to be transferred to the union in victoria, where there will be a state funeral that will televised by the board pass tor, so that everyone can be involved and hear the words. not only family members but all of the dig nit tears would be here, after which his body would be transferred to his home village. which is in the eastern cape. quite a rural area, and it would be a private funeral that the family will hold there. >> . >> we 11ed just a few hours ago that nelson mandela had passed away. the at the time is still a shock, and it is a great shock.
PBS
Dec 5, 2013 4:00pm PST
nelson mandela had been released from prison but now that it has it is after midnight right now. a lot of people will not have heard what has happened. we're likely to see people bit of openery space everywhere in south africa. they will be mourning their hero, their father. that he we we called him in south africa. father to the nation. he is not a saint but he has been good for the reconciliation process of south africa. >> james, i will be with you in a second but i do want to bring ofwers to this view president obama. here is what he had to say. nelsonis trial in 1964, mandela close to statement from the dock saying i have fought against white domination and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideals of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. an ideal that i hope to live for and achieve. it is an ideal, for which i am prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. .oday, he has gone home we have lost one of the mos
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 4:00am PST
>>> this morning, the world wakes to the news that a giant of human and civil rights is gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force for millions, revered for ever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people and to millions around the globe. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. ♪ >>> and good friday morning. people around the world are remembering nelson mandela. the global symbol of fore behrens, peace and dignity. >> here's a live picture from south africa, where people have been celebrating the former leader's life by dancing in the streets throughout the night. you see a large crowd gathering there right now. >> abc's alex marquardt is there in johannesburg, where they're still trying to come to grips with the death of an icon. >> reporter: a new day has dawned here in south africa. there's a profound sense of loss and mourning that's swept the entire country. what's really remarkable are celebrations like this one, right outside mandela's home that we've seen spring up around the country. south africans marking the passing of this great man by celebrating his life. it was just before midnight that south african president jacob zuma announced to the nation and to the world, that nelson mandela had died. >> this is the moment of our deepest sorrow. our nation has lost its greatest son. >> reporter: tributes quickly poured in from around the world, including from president barack obama. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. >> reporter: that love, shown in the massive crowds that quickly gathered outside mandela's home and around the country. singing and dancing, joyfully celebrating the life of a man who gave so many hope and freedom. >> it's tragic. it's sad. i think we should celebrate what he has achieved and what he's given us. i wouldn't be here. i wouldn't be free, as i say, if it wasn't for him. >> reporter: south africa's first black president was surrounded by much of his family when he passed away. now, ten days of national mourning will start, during which mandela will lie in state in the capital, pretoria, so south africans can say their final good-byes, before he's taken back to his ancestral village of qunu for burial. alex marquart, abc news, johannesburg. >>> here at home, the u.s. paying its highest respects. >> president obama has given the order to fly u.s. flags at half-staff, saying mandela no longer belongs to us but to the ages. >>> elsewhere across the nation, people of all walks of life are reacting to the news of nelson mandela's death. >> abc's tahman bradley has the latest from washington. >> reporter: tributes keep pouring in for the man that defeated south africa's brutal apartheid system. americans are paying their respects from indiana to harlem, new york, to brooklyn. >> he was so very strong. >> reporter: in washington, people gathered at mandela's statue outside the south african embassy. >> for me, it's a sense of my boys can have the opportunity to do a lot more things. >> reporter: president obama, attending a hanukkah reception last night at the white house, remembered mandela as a champion of human rights. >> a moral giant who embodied the dignity and the courage and hope. and sought to bring about justice, not only in south africa, but i think inspire millions around the world. >> reporter: those millions, moved by mandela's long walk to freedom. imprisoned for 27 years. he became a global symbol of the fight against apartheid. from his tiny cell, mandela rallied millions against racism and injustice. in 1990, the south african government, under heavy pressure at home and from around the world, released mandela, and began dismantling apartheid. >> never again shall we be that this beautiful world will have the spirit, the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: south africa will hold a memorial service in a 90,000-seat stadium. the white house says president obama plans to attend. john and diana? >> tahman, president obama said he was inspired by nelson mandela. what impact did mandela have on the president's life? >> reporter: huge impact. he met nelson mandela only once in 2005, when the president was a u.s. senator. but he says he studied nelson mandela's writings and works. the president said his first political action was attending an anti-apartheid rally. the president toured mandela's cell on robben island after he took office. and mrs. obama, michelle obama, along with her daughters, sasha and malia, they visited mandela, reading a book with him. and also talking with him. obviously, mandela, south africa's first black president, a huge inspiration to the u.s.'s first black president and his family. >> tahman bradley, live in washington for us this morning. thank you. >>> you heard tahman reference that memorial service that will be held in a football stadium. it's just part of a logistical nightmare south african officials are now facing. >> in addition to the obamas, it's likely that most of the other living u.s. presidents will travel to south africa. dozens of other high-level dignitaries will also attend. the events are being likened to organizing a world cup, plus an inauguration and a coronation, all at the same time. >>> former president clinton was in office when nelson mandela took power. and their families became close. we will remember him as a man of uncommon grace and compassion. for whom abandoning bitterness was a way of life. >>> mandela's two youngest daughters were in london at the time of his death, attending a premiere of a new film about his life. >> they left immediately after getting the news. but they asked the film be played to the end. the audience was told that mandela had died as the closing credits rolled. prince william was one of those watching the film. >> sad and tragic news. we're reminded what an extraordinary and inspiring man nelson mandela was. and my thoughts and prayers are with his family right now. >> british actor, idris elba, who played mandela in the film was also at the event. and he said, quote, we have lost one of the greatest human beings to have ever walked this earth. >>> still ahead, another big story we're watching closely. a severe blast of cold air. dangerous temperatures are gripping much of the country. we'll show you where it's heading next. along with all that ice and snow. >>> and mourning madiba. much more on the death of nelson mandela, including the jail guard, with a remarkable story about helping the imprisoned leader. >>> welcome back. a deep freeze is threatening the safety of nearly 200 million people across much of america this morning. >> the area especially hard-hit stretches from texas to the great lakes. the brutal conditions, bone-chilling temperatures and heavy accumulations of ice and snow. oklahoma, under a state of emergency. one of many southern-central states already crippled by treacherous conditions. in addition to ice and sleet, that area can expect up to six inches of snow, with temperatures colder than alaska. industrial-sized power generators are in place. and emergency shelters are stocked up. the best advice, stay indoors. stay off the roads. >>> and parts of texas through arkansas and tennessee, will be under ice storm warnings throughout the day. stores across the region are running out of supplies. and the expected half-inch or more of ice will bring dangerous driving conditions and widespread power outages. accuweather meteorologist jim dickey is tracking all of it for us. good morning, jim. >> good morning, john and diana. staying frigid here across the northern plains, the upper midwest, into the rockies. many spots well down below zero. minus 4 this morning in minneapolis. minus 12 in denver. minus 15 into pierre. as that cold filters off to the south and east, an area of ice and snow continues here. significant ice storm continues across arkansas, into portions of western kentucky, west tennessee, with heavy snow moving into the ohio valley and northeast. john and diana, back to you. >> jim, thank you. >>> if you're flying, the list of possible airport delays is long. dallas, memphis, atlanta, charlotte, d.c., philadelphia, new york, boston, houston and new orleans. >>> in other news, florida state quarterback jameis winston will not face sexual assault charges. the lead prosecutor says there's just too many gaps in the accuser's story. winston's a leading heisman trophy candidate. he will lead the number one seminoles in tomorrow night's acc title game. >>> here's an airline pilo t's landing attempt you have to see to believe. this is an emirates airlines jet trying to land in fierce winds yesterday in birmingham, england. the captain tried to land twice. but both times he had to abort his attempts. he eventually had to fly to london and land there. the wild ride had one passenger tweeting out, quote, never flying again. >> you look at that video. and that captain made the right choice. that nose is going another direction from the runway. >> coming in sideways. >> wow. >> yikes. >>> when we come back, remembering nelson mandela. reactions are pouring in from celebrities about his passing. our special coverage, nelson mandela, a man who changed the world, continues. the value of your education is where it can take you. 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[ laughter ] >> nelson mandela showing his humorous side almost ten years ago when he bowed out of public life. >> the public never got enough of him. and this morning, crowds still gathering outside of mandela's home in johannesburg. the former south african president dying yesterday at 95 years old. he is being remembered for his fight against apartheid and years in prison. a sacrifice that influenced millions, including president obama. >> today, he's gone home. we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will ever share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> there will be nearly two weeks of mourning in south africa. and nelson mandela will lie in state in pretoria until he is buried in his ancestral village. >>> a very young robin roberts had the opportunity to meet nelson mandela's family. robin journeyed to south africa three years ago. and last night, she described her experience to diane sawyer on "world news." >> when i broke to graca machel, the woman he married on his 80th birthday, and i asked her, what is her husband's legacy going to be? and she said, a visionary leader. and it is the quality, the quality of leadership. >> robin went on to say that mandela wanted to right the wrongs and give each one of us the feeling that we could do the same thing, too. >> mandela also showed the world the meaning of true forgiveness. by the time he walked out of prison, he had formed an unlikely bond with one of his jailers. abc's david muir explains. >> reporter: christo brand peers out over the water, to the former prison on robben island, where he first reported for duty at 18. >> they informed us we're going to meet the biggest criminals in the history of south africa. >> reporter: nelson mandela was nearly 60. already in prison for more than a decade. still forced to sleep on the floor. the young jailer's family was afrikaner, the party that supported apartheid. but when the young jailer met mandela, he met an elder who would treat the young white man with respect. and the jailer would slowly offer the same in return. christo brand told us of one of winnie mandela's visits. and her request. >> she said, can i just show mandela from a distance? and i said, no. just leave the child. >> reporter: no children allowed. not even his precious new grandbaby. while she waited in a holding area, that jailer had secretly brought the baby to mandela. >> there were just tears coming out of his eyes. >> reporter: and no one ever knew? >> nobody knew. >> reporter: all of the isolating years on robben island, the prison guard said there was one view from the prison courtyard of the country nelson mandela loved. that was the top of table mountain here in capetown behind me. that mandela would look to this view, wondering if he'd ever be free. but mandela was always preparing for that day. he asked the jailer to teach him afrikaans, the language of the whites in power. there were essays and the red pen that corrected them. on the day mandela was released, his speech was delivered in afrikaans. mandela famously said, if you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. if you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart. >> that's what he did. that's what he strived for. that's what he loved for. that's what he fighted for while he was in prison, to have people live in peace. >> reporter: the jailer, who became a trusted friend, now remembering nelson mandela. >> incredible story there. he touched so many lives. talk show titan oprah winfrey also weighing in on mandela's passing. >> winfrey, who credits mandela as the inspiration behind her school for girls in south africa, said being in his presence was like sitting with grace and majesty at the same time. and she added, one of the great honors of my life was to be invited to nelson mandela's home, spend private time and get to know him. he was everything you've ever heard and more. humble and unscathed by bitterness. >> that is completely understandable. mandela once said sports has the power to change the world. >> the 1995 rugby world cup in south africa, mandela donned the home team's jersey, which for generations had been linked only to white south africa. it was truly a moment of national reconciliation. >> tiger woods, among the major sports stars weighing in on mandela's death. woods and his father met mandela in 1998. >> he certainly had an impact on my life and my father. and that timeframe in which -- when he came out, could have -- the country could have fallen apart. it could have gone a lot of different ways. and he led it to where it's at now. and the world's going to miss him. >> mandela kept a low profile while south africa hosted soccer's 2010 world cup. his memorable appearance came before the final in johannesburg, when he was driven around the field amid a thunderous ovation. it would be mandela's last public appearance. >> that smile is so charming. isn't it? >>> up next, the first lady on her one and only meeting with mandela. >> and how this event is playing out in social media, unlike any other before it. 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[announcer] start using intuit quickbooks for free at quickbooks-dot-com. ♪ >>> i told him, you cannot imagine how important your legacy is to who i am, to who my husband is. and i just said, thank you. thank you. thank you. >> first lady michelle obama expressing the thoughts of so many when it comes to nelson mandela. >> many well-known others, of course, taking to social media to have their say about him. abc's jim avila reports. >> reporter: nelson mandela made history in grainy black and white. but his death was fully covered by modern social media, approaching 4 million tweets in the first two hours after his death was announced. former president bill clinton posting this picture. a handshake and the words, i will never forget my friend, madiba. and on facebook, george w. bush, president mandela was one of the great forces for freedom and equality of our time. he bore his burdens with dignity and grace. and our world is better off because of his example. it's the type of worldwide experience that draws young and old, black and white, to share feelings. south african native actress charlize theron. my thoughts and love go out to the mandela family. rest in peace, madiba. you will be missed. but your impact on this world will live forever. director spike lee posted this picture with a simple message. and then, there's this one from nasa. intergalactic reaction from the space shuttle, posting a picture of mandela's beloved south africa. and as crowds continue to gather in front of mandela's home, perhaps the day's most poignant message from mandela's own twitter account. death is something inevitable. when a man has done what he considers to be his duty to his people and his country, he can rest in peace. a virtual memorial on social media. electronic good-byes for the man who brought the world together. jim avila, abc news, new york. >>> well, those electronic good-byes are exploding across social media. newspapers, eulogizing the civil rights icon. >> some of this morning's notable headlines. britain's "daily mail," "death of a colossus." "new york times" calling him, "fighter, prisoner, president and symbol." south africa's "cape times" "1918-2013." and "the daily news," farewell, dear friend. seat? ♪ or let's say there's an accident. if you have esurance, you can use their mobile app to start a claim... upload a few photos... and get your money fast. maybe that doesn't make you a control freak. more like a control enthusiast. esurance. insurance for the modern world. now backed by allstate. click or call. esurance. insurance for the modern world. what does that first spoonful taste likok. honey bunches of oats. ching! mmmm! mmmm! mmmm! wow! it's the oats. honey. yeah. honey bunches of oats. this is a great cereal. for aveeno® positively radiant face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] aveeno® with soy helps reduce the look of brown spots in 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. aveeno®. naturally beautiful results. ta-da! aveeno®. whoa. showtime. agh! there's me! there's me! there's me! boom. ohhhh! ♪ hd 4 eight years into the disease was when all the light went out. for me, it was heart-wrenching. look into the eyes of somebody with alzheimer's sometime, you just don't see -- the person's soul is, like, gone. bea: and it takes a toll on everyone. i mean, it's -- it's a depressing disease to watch unfold before your eyes. she actually thought those of us who were caring for her and who loved her most were her worst enemies. more and more responsibilities fell on my shoulders. lisa: this disease just ravages a family. it changes your life. the magnitude of it is indescribable. my mother taught me to be in the moment. we have to live in the moment with them. and i'm going to be with that person right now, in this moment, wherever she is. art: now is the moment. if we work together, we can stop this epidemic. grace: contact brightfocus and learn more. >>> live from the kgo-tv broadcast center this is abc7 news. >> good friday morning at 4:28. >> one of my favorite movies is "groundhog day" and it has been like that all week. >> now we need the snow and the insurance salesman, ned. >> sonny and cher. >> absolutely. check out the temperature in novato: 19 degrees! we are in the mid-20's in santa rosa and napa and upper 20's in san ramon. 30 in los gatos. near frost in san jose at 33 the same in conquer. 34 in fremont and san carlos and 34 in mountain view and hayward is 36. half moon bay at 33. san francisco is 43. we have chilled sunshine today with temperatures around 50 and we will have high clouds. that will be the beginning of our rain and snow. guess who is back? >> good morning, everyone. happy friday. it is chilly. warm up the car before you head out to the roads. we have construction that could get in your way if you are headed to berkeley eastbound 80 traveling between powell and buchanan, a few lanes blocked off until 5:00. tracy to dublin, friday light with 23 minutes in westbound. antioch to concord is 15 minutes and 101 southbound from san rafael to san francisco is 16 minutes and outside into walnut creek, southbound 680 away from highway 4 to the 24 junction is empty at this hour. eric and kristen? >> the second morning of the freeze warning is re difficult to handle for the bay area. pipes are a casualty of the cold snap. amy hollyfield is in walnut creek. >> look behind me, here is a number we are not used to seeing in the bay area, 29 degrees in walnut creek. it is too much for humans and pipes to handle. a large water main burst in martinez last night before 10:00 and it caused flooding at local businesses. they have turned off the water but what a mess. it is happening in homes, too, a woman learned the hard way the importance of covering up the pipes. >> i opened the curtains and i saw the water and i thought, well, it is not raining. >> the temperature was below 20 degrees in rohnert park so if you have to use towels to wrap up the types, better than nothing. leaving them exposed to cause you big problems. wrap color self up, too, it is freezing again this morning. you will need the big ode
CBS
Dec 6, 2013 6:30pm EST
>> pelley: tonight, celebrating mandela. south africans pay tribute to the father of their country as the government announces plans for his services. a delegation of u.s. presidents will attend. reports from deborah patta, mark phillips, and michelle miller. anthony mason on the best jobs report since the great recession. but what kind of jobs is the economy creating? an ice storm causes havoc in the middle of the country. manuel bojorquez is there. and allen pizzey on the years that made the man. >> for 18 of the 27 years he spent in prison, nelson mandela walked down this corridor everyday and at the end of that walk there was no freedom, there was this. >> reporter: with bob simon on the moment he was free. >> after 27 years, his head was high and his fist was clenched. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. the south african government announced today that the state funeral for former president nelson mandela will be a week from sunday-- the culmination of days of memorial services. president obama will lead the u.s. delegation and he's invited the former american presidents to join him. mourners continued to gather today at mandela's home in johannrg died last night and at his former home in soweto. and for us, no one image captured his legacy better than this-- blacks and whites side by side honoring the father of a multiracial south africa. a man who became a worldwide symbol for racial equality. deborah patta is there. >> reporter: the streets of south africa were a riot of color, an explosion of song and dance today. from the sprawling township of soweto to the plush upmarket suburb of hall on the, it was precisely the kind of sendoff nelson mandela would have loved. since his death was announced, south africans from all over the country have been making a pilgrimage to mandela's home in johannesburg. they came bearing flowers, gifts, and messages of support. and if they had nothing to give, they shared their talents instead. for some, it was overwhelming. >> if we can do a little bit of what he did everyday, we'll live a very different world. the first time i voted was '94 so it's a great day. >> reporter: but mostly there were tears of joy. an impromptu celebration with people of every color honoring the legacy of a leader like no other. >> look at it here. if there ever was a center of the universe it would be right here right now at the death of nelson mandela. >> i am not mourning. i am celebrating what his life sacrificed and i've come to thank god for his life to say thank you. because he has united us. >> reporter: if his life's mission was to unite a racially divided country, it was his death that revealed how successful he'd been. >> pelley: deborah patta joins us now front of mandela's home in johannesburg. deborah, what are the plans going forward? >> reporter: an unprecedented period of mourning, scott, ten days in all. part of which includes nelson mandela's body lying in state for official public viewing. there will be a massive memorial service at a soccer stadium in soweto, and culminating in a private family funeral and burial and that's on the 15th of december. >> pelley: deborah patta in south africa. deborah, thank you very much. well, nelson mandela belonged to the world and today the world remembered. the flag atop the white house flew at half-staff. the new york stock exchange fell silent before the opening bell. and in india school children lit candles and said prayers. mark phillips has more on why mandela is so revered throughout the world. >> thank you! >> reporter: as much as the years could diminish nelson mandela's body and perhaps in the latter stages of his life his mind, they couldn't diminish the man. >> for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence. >> reporter: there aren't many politicians-- especially ones engaged in battles as bitter and complex as the ones he fought-- who left such a clean battlefield. >> africa! >> reporter: mohammed valli moosa was one of mandela's trusted lieutenants. >> what's so remarkable is that nelson mandela is now everybody's hero. everybody loves him, blacks and whites. everybody loves. him >> reporter: nelson mandela's story was south africa's story. >> i greet you all in the name of peace. >> reporter: but his special talent was to do the apparently impossible-- to offer the hope of democracy to oppressed black majority while at the same time managing the fear of change in the until-then all-powerful white minority. it was a balancing act that columnists like pinky khoabane say only mandela could manage. >> people see him completely above the politics of the day. >> reporter: of his day and the current day. >> of his day and the current day. i mean, they see no fault. >> reporter: the promise of the new south africa has not always been fulfilled. democracy has not brought prosperity-- far from it. nelson mandela is revered for more than simply being the father of the new south africa, he represents a simpler time when the distinctions between the rights and the wrongs were more clearly defined. after two decades of democracy here, things are a lot murkier now. south africa's current leadership under president jacob zuma is wallowing in a storm o allegations of corruption and mismanagement. >> we've been very saddened by the deaths of all these stalwarts. >> reporter: of his generation? >> yes, of his generation. and every time they go we have this deep sense of sadness and loss because they are in a different mold. we don't see this crass materialism that we see today. >> reporter: south africa will be burying more than a man, it will be burying some of its dreams. mark phillips, cbs news, johannesburg. >> pelley: perhaps the most dramatic moment in the life of nelson mandela was his emergence from prison in 1990 after more than a quarter of a century out of public view. bob simon was there that day and this is how he reported it. >> reporter: after 27 years, his head was high and his fist was clenched. nelson mandela walked out of the prison today like a chief of state, flanked by his first lady and by the men who'd been hired to protect him. there they were, the south african state police, providing security for the man who'd once been the most wanted man in africa. >> reporter: i was a young correspondent at cbs and i remember admiring that piece enormously. bob simon is joining us tonight. bob, what do you remember about that first moment when you saw a free nelson mandela? >> the remarkable thing was, nobody had seen or heard a word from him in 27 years so we didn't know if we were seeing a dotterring old man broken by the apartheid regime. we didn't know even though he'd negotiated with the regime whether he'd go free and say to his a.n.c. buddies "okay, let's get them" and create rivers of blood. or whether he was there to lead the nation. and we didn't know for 24 hours. that night he gave a long, rambling boring speech and we were worried the next morning he gave a news conference and he called on reporters from the pro-apartheid papers, he treated them like friends and he was eloquent and funny and gracious and i thought "maybe he can do it." >> pelley: was there any single experience that you had in all the experiences you had in south africa that gave you a real measure of the man? >> yes, and it had nothing to do with him. i went to the island, robben island, several times and once i just went and stood on this barren rock and you could see cape town. you could see cape town from there. and i recommend to anyone who wants to get a measure of the man to just stand on that rock for a couple of hours and then try to imagine what it would be like being there for 27 years. and then try to imagine what it would be like getting out of there after 27 years and not wanting to murder the people who sent you there. that's the measure of nelson mandela. >> pelley: bob simon, "60 minutes" correspondent. you'll have a piece on mandela on "60 minutes" this sunday. bob, thanks for joining us tonight. and there's another important story tonight. we got the best jobs report in five years. the unemployment rate fell three tenths of a point last month to 7%. the economy created 203,000 jobs. that news helped wall street snap a five-session losing streak. the dow finished the day with a gain of nearly 200 points. here's anthony mason. >> reporter: in a warehouse in louisville, kentucky, this week, bob marie know addressed his employees, many of them new seasonal hires. >> look at the jobs we've created, look at the faces we have here. >> reporter: marie know is c.e.o. of cafe press, a company that makes custom goods like mugs, t-shirts and clocks. with business growing, he's needed to increase his seasonal work force by as much as 20%. >> this year we're gonna be hiring 700 to 800 folks and that augment it is crew of about 450 that we have here year round. >> reporter: for three of the last four months now, employers across the country have hired at least 200,000 workers. at the meeting, marie kno maried his holiday work force if they wanted job. >> i mean, not just a seasonal job, a full-time job. yeah, i thought so, it's like that every year. >> reporter: 29-year-old matthew daugherty was one of those who put up his hand. laid off from his welding job, he's printing t-shirts over the holidays. >> as a welder i get laid off quite often. here they stay pretty busy i'm looking to get hired on. >> reporter: if hiring continues at its current pace nationally, employment could finally climb back to its prerecession levels by next summer. but marino says the effects of the recession still linger. >> i think everybody's waiting to get it in the rear-view mirror and march forward and turn the american economy back to what it should be. >> reporter: you mentioned that wall street rally, scott. investors are hoping the economy is now strong enough to withstand a scaling back of the federal reserve stimulus which is expected within the next few months. >> pelley: it's been such a long time. >> sure has. >> pelley: anthony, thank you very much. tonight one of the worst ice storms in years stretches from texas to pennsylvania. it's blamed for at least three deaths. more than 300,000 homes and businesses have lost power in dallas alone. manuel bojorquez is there. >> reporter: it was an uphill battle all day. onramps became as slippery as bobsled runs. and parking lots became ice rinks. 30 cars became stranded on this overpass in austin. even first responders needed to be rescued. many more were stuck at the airport with 1,000 flights canceled in and out of dallas. utility crews in texas and arkansas tried to knock heavy ice off power lines before they snapped from the weight. the ice is also weighing down trees. this oak fell on christina goodman's home in the middle of the night. >> we literally sleep right there so if had been a few feet over we maybe would all be at the emergency room right now. >> reporter: this storm is blamed for at least one death in oklahoma and parts of arkansas could see temperatures drop to zero. that's balmy compared to the snow-swept northern plains. the arctic mass sitting over the midwest made it feel like 20 below in duluth, minnesota. the air so cold steam lifted from lake superior. the icy mix that caused so much trouble here has moved into tennessee. scott, the storm is expected to bring freezing rain and snow in a band stretching from the ohio river valley to new england. >> pelley: amazing pictures from the lake. manuel, thanks very much. a train wreck has led to an emergency safety order. we have an update on the whales that got stranded in the everglades. and nelson mandela might have spent his entire life in prison if not for american protesters. those stories when the "cbs evening news" continues. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we didn't get into business to spend time managing receipts, that's why we have ink. we like being in business because we like being creative, we like interacting with people. so you have time to focus on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. >> pelley: nelson mandela was famous, but it wasn't always that way. and therein lies the story told tonight by michelle miller. >> reporter: in 1984, most americans had never heard of nelson mandela. >> the south african government has not responded to our demands favorably. >> reporter: political activists randall robinson was on a mission to change that. >> the strategy was to find ways to dramatize the relationship between the west and the south african apartheid system. we were the legs on which it's standing. >> reporter: robinson staged a it is if in with congressman walter font ro on the troy fauns berry. they told the ambassador they would not leave until their demands were met. >> first was the immediate release of nelson mandela from prison and second the demand was that all other black political prisoners be released and thirdly that they begin immediately the dismantlement of the apartheid system. >> reporter: al three were jailed. that one act of civil disobedience led to a year of daily protests at the embassy where celebrities, members of congress and citizens were also arrested. >> we put 5,000 people in jail at the embassy and that drove the headlines. >> free south africa! >> reporter: the movement pressured politicians to act. >> on this vote -- >> reporter: and in 1986, congress overroad president reagan's veto and imposed trade sanctions against south africa. u.s. businesses were forced to divest, costing the regime over $350 million that year alone. four years later, mandela was free. >> nelson mandela taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> reporter: robinson says mandela's public persona was the same as his private one. he saw that firsthand when a hotel housekeeper accidentally walked in to a meeting. >> the moment that she walked into the room he stood up because a gentleman stands when a lady comes into the room. his sense of courtesy, it was genuine, it was a private moment, never to be seen or remarked publicly. it told me something about the man. >> reporter: a man whose respect for each individual taught us so much about dignity and justice for all. michelle miller, cbs news, boston. >> pelley: back with more news in a moment. a mouth breather! how do you sleep like that? you dry up, your cold feels even worse. well, put on a breathe right strip and shut your mouth. cold medicines open your nose over time, but add a breathe right strip, and pow! it instantly opens your nose up to 38% 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[ male announcer ] that's handy. ♪ [ male announcer ] that's handy. and our networks are getting crowded. but if congress, the fcc, and the administration free up... more licensed wireless spectrum, we can empower more... people to innovate, create new technologies and jobs... and strengthen the economy. america is the world's leader in wireless. let's keep it that way. free up licensed spectrum today, so wireless... can do more for america tomorrow. >> pelley: today federal regulators ordered new york's metro north commuter railroad to change its signal system so that trains can't speed and to put two operators on routes that have dangerous curves. last sunday, a metro north train flew off the tracks in the bronx when it hit a 30 miles an hour curve at 82 miles an hour. four passengers were killed. the engineer told investigators he'd been in a daze before the derailment. tonight police in mexico are guarding a hospital where six people are being treated for radiation exposure. a government official says they are suspects in the theft this week of a truck that was carrying radioactive material used in medical equipment. the truck and the material were recovered on wednesday. the police said the thieves probably had no idea they were putting their lives in danger. some of the whales that were stranded in shallow water in florida are on the move but maybe not to safety. more than 20 of the pilot whales escaped to deeper water but today some were spotted moving back toward shore. this week, nearly four dozen pilot whales were spotted in everglades national park. at least 11 have died. nelson mandela spent 18 years in this prison. but prison didn't change him. in the end, he changed the prison. that story is next. i earn every month" card.t h it's not the "i only earn decent rewards at the gas station" card. it's the no-games, no-signing up, everyday-rewarding, kung-fu-fighting, silver-lightning-in-a-bottle, bringing-home-the-bacon cash back card. this is the quicksilver card from capital one. unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere, every single day. so ask yourself, what's in your wallet? they're about 10 times softer and may have surface pores where bacteria can multiply. polident kills 99.99% of odor causing bacteria and helps dissolve stains so dentures are cleaner, fresher, and brighter. 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[ man ] shhhh! for fast cold and flu relief, day or night, try alka-seltzer plus day and night liquid gels. >> pelley: earlier in the broadcast, bob simon told us about mandela's release after 27 years as a political prisoner. he spent most of those years on robben island, northwest of cape town. the conditions there would have broken most men, but in many ways they made nelson mandela. here's allen pizzey. >> reporter: when the apartheid regime shipped nelson mandela to this bleak wind-swept island they thought he and his fellow black resistance leaders would quickly be forgotten. eddie daniels arrived here alone, chained, and terrified to serve 15 years for -r sabotage. >> initially it was very bad. it was 24 hour silence and all we had in our cells was a mat, one mat, we had three blankets, very thin, and dirty. and it was cold, cold, cold. we slept with all our clothes on. >> reporter: on eddie daniels' third day he had an encounter that changed his life. >> i saw this big man standing in front of me and i looked up and saw it was nelson mandela i said "good afternoon, mr. mandela." he said "the name is nelson. welcome." so we became friends. >> reporter: for 18 of the 27 years he spent in prison, nelson mandela walked down this corridor everyday and at the end of this walk there was no freedom, there was this. an eight foot square cell with a mattress on the floor for his bed and a bucket for a toilet. mandela was allowed one visitor a year for half an hour. mandela and daniels were among 30 political prisoners isolated in what was simply called "b" block. >> we sat on the brick. >> reporter: mandela and his fellow inmates worked long days in the yard sitting on bricks ordered only to look straight ahead they smashed slate into gravel with hammers. black inmates worert in all weather. the apartheid regime's way of reminding them that all black men were considered boys no maer what their age. the yard is now just another stop on the robben island tourist route. but no visitor can imagine what it meant to eddie daniels when his jailors allowed the "b" block prisoners in the yard one night after six years being locked in by sun set. >> i looked up and there were the stars. big and beautiful. i felt i could touch them. it was tremendous. tremendous. >> reporter: in 1990, after 27 brutal years of incarceration, nelson mandela walked out of jail and called for reconciliation not revenge and when on to transform the aoeu apartheid regime into what came to be called the rainbow nation. as for the place that will forever be linked with nelson mandela -- >> and the symbolic meaning of the island changed. no longer fear or pain but a place symbolizing freedom, symbolizing respect for your fellow human beings. today robben island is that symbol. >> reporter: allen pizzey, cbs news, robben island. >> pelley: that's the "cbs evening news" for tonight. there will be more about nelson mandela on a cbs news special, nelson mandela: father of a nation. that's tomorrow night at 9:00, 8:00 central time. i'll see you then and i'll see you again. question leave you now with the. captioning sponsored by cbs captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >>> as of tonight we now know the schedule of official events celebrating the life and mourning the passing of nelson mandela. >> more on that in a moment, but first topper is tracking this storm system that threats to give us our -- threatens to give us our first taste of winter weather. >> right now it's producing rain for us and snow out toward ohio and pennsylvania. it will move slowly south and east. this storm clears us tonight. then a second storm comes and get us over the weekend. we'll zoom in. we've got snow and a mix towards pittsburgh but all for rain for us, a little bit of a mix occurring west of the divide toward garrett county, but for us this is the latest image, just rain keeping the roads wet this friday night. the good news is we won't see freezing temperatures tone. windstorm watch goes into effect sunday and sunday night for pretty much the entire metro area with the exception of st. mary's and calvert county primarily for sleet and freezing rain. please be careful walking when you get your sunday paper. ice will accumulate on trees and power lines. check your flashlight batteries, critical time 9 a.m. sunday. so some of you will have to deal with a little snow on your way to church, 9 a.m. sunday until 3 a.m. on monday we stay below freezing. temps right now chilly but safe, above freezing. 41 gaithersburg, 43 manassas, leesburg and 45 downtown. we'll dom back, talk mo
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 1:40am PST
>> yeah. hello, and welcome to millionaire. we got another big one today because it's double money week continues, y'all! se] yeah. contestants have a shot at doubling their money on just one question. and that means that we show 'em the money, and then we show it to 'em again. then we make it rain cash, and then it rains twice as hard, all right? joining us today is someone who was sitting in our audience just one week ago, and now she's right here in the spotlight. from brooklyn, new york, y'all show some love for clarice mathews. what up? >> brooklyn, brooklyn, brooklyn! >> how you doin'? >> i'm good! i'm good! i'm good! i'm glad to be here! >> so you were sitting in the audience a week ago. now you got to explain, and you kind of have this cool pastime. what do you do? >> well, since i retired from the nypd... >> okay. >> my girlfriends and i, we like to visit talk shows. the girls are here with me-- >> where your crew at? [cheers and applause] oh! uh-oh! >> go, clarice! >> all: go, clarice! go, clarice! >> oh, my goodness. >> they gonna need they own lifelines. i see right-- a'ight, well, this exciting. i'm glad you here. i'm excited for you. >> i'm so excited. i can't believe that i'm on tv-- and double money too. >> i want you to win a lot of money too. >> whoo! >> you know what? let's check out the money we got for you in round one. here we go, clarice. this is all the money that's gonna be available in round 1. i'm gonna have the computer randomize that right now. so that's gonna be shuffled up. this'll be all of the categories to all of your questions right here. shuffle those as well. all right, you know what we gonna do. let's take a look and see where your double money question is. ah, so you know it's kind of about halfway up there. you know, you're gonna have to fight to get it, all right? >> i'm a swimmer! >> that's it. everything is all shuffled up. if you ready to play, clarice, we can do this. >> i'm ready. >> audience, you ready? [cheers and applause] let's play millionaire! [cheers and applause] yeah. with tracks such as ur not too old, dance, 57-year-old sharon saide embraces her age by spinning records under what name? >> okay. seeing as she's the same age as i am now, and i've already experienced some of those things, if i was doing the djing, i'd call myself dj hotflash. "d," final answer. >> and you would do that every time? >> hot flash! >> make it hot! make it flash! dj hotflash is correct! [cheers and applause] clarice, let's get things started. put some money in the bank! $500, all. >> i'll take it, i'll take it. >> you got to love it. >> take it. >> here we go. this is your next question. "branching out." while they settled on video games, nintendo has engaged in all but which of the following businesses? >> i cook a lot of instant rice at home. i don't remember any of them being nintendo brand. >> [chuckles] >> hotel chain? i am not-- >> you'd be djing and cookin' rice at the same time, like, hot flash--whoo! wha--wicka-wicka! hot flash! with the hot rice! >> whoo! i might even put some hot sauce with the hot flash in the instant rice. okay. however-- >> however--i like that. >> i am not so sure what nintendo is involved in other than basba--i mean a video game, so--and i can't really even figure this one out. so i think i'll jump the question. >> all right. yeah, not really sure. nothing popped out at as, like, that one thing they never done. all right, you decided to jump over this one. it's now out of play, clarice. let's see what the correct answer is. baseball gloves. >> oh, i would have never guessed that. >> so, yeah, they did. it's double money week, so let's hope this is not big. what'd you jump over? $2,000, so that's a'ight. you cool with that? >> i'm good. >> all right. here we go. this is you next question. >> all right. >> "don't do it." contrary to popular belief, the cdc says that you should not do what during an earthquake? >> oh, man! see, i live in new york. >> so it's contrary to popular belief. >> yeah, contrary. i'm not--oh, contrary! contrary to popular belief... i'm gonna go with "c," final answer. >> well, it's a good thing, 'cause that's right. >> [shrieks] >> just like that. she number "c," final answer. that's right. you should not stand in a doorway. let's get some cash going for clarice. here we go! $100. >> i'll take that. >> that's all good. >> i got it. >> steady climbin'. it's all positive. 600 bucks. here we go. this is your next question. a name that shifts the blame, what revolutionary war event did loyalists and the british refer to as "the riot on king street"? >> all right, i know fort sumter was the civil war, and the alamo was somewhere down in texas, and texas wasn't around during the revolutionary war, i don't think, so the burning of washington and the boston massacre. name that shifts the blame. all right, i'm gonna go with... jumping the question 'cause i'm not sure. >> it's my boo. >> [laughter] >> you gonna hit me with my whole move. i was all like, "what are you gonna do? oh, you gonna jump the question." so you jumped over. not really sure, decided to jump over it. >> not really sure, yeah. >> all right, it is now out of play. you thinkin' it was possibly "b," 'cause that's the one you would have, if you would have guessed. >> yes, if i would have guessed. >> what is the correct answer? it is indeed "b," the boston massacre. again, it's double money week. hopefully this money is small. what'd she jump over? oh, well, jumped over $1,000. that's all right. when we come back, clarice is going for her double money question. millionaire in just a second. it's so much more than coffee. brew the love. keurig. on the table by not choosing the right medicare d plan. no one could have left this much money here. whoo-hoo-hoo! yet many seniors who compare medicare d plans realize they can save hundreds of dollars. cvs/pharmacy wants to help you save on medicare expenses. talk to your cvs pharmacist, call, or go to cvs.com/compare to get your free, personalized plan comparison today. call, go online, or visit your local store today. chose prego homestyle alfredo over ragu classic alfredo. prego alfredo?! [ thinking ] why can't all new things be this great? ha ha! whoa! [ monkey squeals ] [ sighs ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. i got clarice mathews from brooklyn, new york, with me right now. she's got $600 in the bank. had to use a couple of lifelines, but you are about to face your double money quest [cheers and applause] now... i mean, and looking at it, i mean, all the small money's gone, so, i mean, this could be big. this could be, like-- >> i got nowhere to go but up, right? >> you got nowhere to go but up. it's all big cash from here. you gonna go crazy if you win the big money? >> hold your hat. >> hold my hat? >> hold your hat. >> all right. all right. you ready? >> i'm ready. >> all right, let's get it going. let's play! here we go, big money! [cheers and applause] including members c.s. lewis and j.r.r. tolkien, what elite book club often met at a pub in oxford, england? >> i really don't know this, so i'm going to have to rely on the audience. >> all right. audience, clarice needs your help. need you to go to those keypads and vote. help her out. double money. [percussive music] the vote is in. let's see what the audience had to say. 74% of them went with inklings. 74%, that's strong. >> i kind of like that percentage. i like it a lot. >> okay. >> all right. i like it so much that i'm gonna go with the audience and say that "b" is my final answer, 'cause they look really good. >> decide to go with the audience. they all look like a bunch of readers. >> yeah, they do. >> they sit around, and they're all book club people, and they're like-- they're like, "oh, we know all the names of different book clubs. >> yes! >> you went with 'em. >> i went with 'em. >> it was a good thing, clarice, 'cause they got your back! inklings is right! [cheers and applause] this is a double money question. hopefully this audience brought it home for you. for double the money, how much is it? oh! oh! oh! as i hold my hat! [cheers and applause] she's gone crazy! it's mayhem! whoo! [cheers and applause] nice! nice! >> [shrieking and whooping] >> whoa! >> whoo! whoo! >> $50,000 question. [cheers and applause] >> whoo! >> that was exciting. >> whoo! it's so exciting, i hardly talk now. >> clarice, you got $50,600 in the bank right now. [cheers and applause] you're doing great. you had to use your last lifeline. >> it was well worth it. >> well worth it, indeed it was. now you got five questions left to be out of round 1. you ready to keep playing? >> yes, i am. >> let's just go on to a million dollars. here we go. this here is your next question. in 2013, what aptly named new jersey man was accused of accidentally texting a cop to see if he wanted to buy a quarter pound of marijuana? you police now. you might have known this. >> [laughs] well, if i had a quarter pound of marijuana, i would think that i would be a dealer, so i'm gonna go with "b," nicholas dealer. >> final answer? >> final answer. >> so your little police knowledge kinda came up on this one right here. >> yeah-huh. >> you got it right, clarice! that's right! nicholas dealer. [cheers and applause] can it get any better? how much more money can we add? >> [shrieks] >> $10,000! >> whoo! [laughs] whoo! >> it is crazy right now. >> whoo-hoo! whoo! whoo! whoo! >> oh, my goodness! >> whoo! >> 60,600 bucks right now. >> [laughing] whoo! >> all right. well, this is exciting. i mean, here you are, 4 questions away from locking all of this in and being out of round 1. you ready to keep pl >> i'm ready >> i'm ready. come on, let's do it. here you go. this is your next question. sounding like the plot of an animated movie, bill nye stated we could stop asteroids from hitting earth by unleashing what to reroute them? >> laser bees. missile hummingbirds. whoo. i have no more lifelines. i don't want to just guess it out. i have to tell you guys, i have loved being on this show. i really--i loved it. thank you so, so much. whoo! i think... >> no leap? >> i think i t >> i think i think i know what the answer is because my family told me, "think it out." >> okay. >> and in thinking it out, i think i know, but right now, i am so excited. i think i'm gonna walk and go home. >> your final answer? >> it's my final answer. thank you, thank-- >> so you were thinking-- what were you thinking? just in case. >> i was thinking missile hummingbirds. >> it's interesting thing you decided to walk. the correct answer was "c," laser bees. >> whoo! thank you! >> so clarice did it up! >> thank you! >> you're gonna walk out of-- >> oh, my gosh! thank you, thank you so much! >> leaving out o >> leaving out of here with $30,300. >> whoo! >> what an amazing player! more millionaire in just a second. oh, you got to love it! >> welcome back to double money week on millionaire. we're here with kristan watson from las vegas. give her some love. how are you, kristan? >> good, thank you. >> good. now i understand you are a lawyer in las vegas. that's got to keep you busy. >> yes. all right, well, we want to get you some money. we want to get things going for you, all right? let's see the money we have for you in round 1. all right, that's all of the money. i'm gonna have the computer randomize the money and all of the categories. everything has been scrambled up. now let's take a look and see where your double money question is. oh! early. >> really early. >> pretty early on. >> all right. >> kristan, you ready? >> yes. >> let's play millionaire. let's go. [cheers and applause] certainly making it easy to see the results of their work, turkish scientists recently bred glow-in-the-dark rabbits by supplying them with the dna from >> actually heard about this. i'm pretty sure it's "d," jellyfish. final answer. >> kristan, you got it right right off the top. here we go. loosenin' up. kristan's jumpin' in with all the right answers. let's show her some money right away. $10,000! [cheers and applause] that's a great start right there. you already got $10,000. and this is your double money question right away. spoken by daniel craig, the final lines in the three most recent james bond films have included all but which of the following. >> don't know this. my roommate would know this. he's a huge james bond fan. i'm gonna ask the audience. >> all right, you gonna use a lifeline and ask the audience. audience, kristan needs your help right now, so i need you to go to your keypads and vote. [percussive music] >> all right, the vote is in. let's see what the audience had to say. ooh, they're kind of all over the place right now with 36% going with james bond as being the one that's not being said. that's 22%, 26%, "c," i never left, 22% "a." >> which is kind of what i was thinking. but... [sighs] >> double money. >> i know. but if i get it wrong... >> you got to stay alive, right. >> i'ma go with "d," james bond. final answer. >> kristan, the correct answer was "a." >> that's okay. that's okay. >> we'll see. >> that's--that's fine. that's fine. >> oh. oh, wow. man. >> that's fine. >> all right. hey, we'll be right back with a little more millionaire right after these, man. buy susan a keurig brewer. brew the love. keurig. theand the kids always eat sky their vegetables.e. because the salad there is always with the original hidden valley ranch. day: stay tuned for the answer. >> the answer to that question was foggy. [cheers and applause] welcome back to millionaire. all right, it's now that time of the show where i get to pick one of you to come down here and take a shot at $1,000! who do i want? [cheers and applause] who do i want? [cheers and applause] you, buddy. i want you, right here, yup. you right there. come on down. yeah. yeah. yo! hyped! >> yeah! >> nice! welcome, man. there's your spot. what's your name, sir? >> michael mudrak. >> michael what? >> mudrak. >> michael mudrak, what's up? man, how you doing? >> i am fired up! >> obviously. >> yeah! >> you like, "yaaaaaah!" >> yeah! >> aaaaaaaaauuuuuuuugh! >> yeah! >> okay, all right. you know, since it's double money week--i usually just do $1,000--but if you get this question right, i'ma give you $2,000, man. >> yeah! >> michael, are you ready? >> i am ready! >> audience, are you ready? [cheers and applause] let's play millionaire! [dramatic musical flourish] here we go, man. perhaps due to all the information they remember, a 2006 study found that taxi drivers often have an abnormally developed what? >> i believe it's "a," hippocampus. >> final answer? >> final answer. >> why do you--why'd you-- how do you know this? >> hippocampus is in the brain. >> yes. you know what, michael? you got it right, baby! >> yeah! >> that's it! this guy's got paper! he's going crazy! he's all over the place! >> yeah! >> with $2,000 in the bank. what a player! we are partners. >> yeah! >> that's right. that's all the time we have in this episode of millionaire. this guy's a thousandaire-- two thousand! till the next time i see you, watch your wallet! yeah! >> closed captioning sponsored by: i got the tree, open ahh!door! there's a better way to save... at the sears one day sale! get 60% off coats for the family. and 50% off this craftsman toolset. plus 10 percent in points with a sears card. holiday a better way. sears. you're history. selsun blue itchy dry scalp. gets to the root of dandruff and hydrates the scalp. selsun blue itchy dry scalp. mandela being alive, now that he's gone, there's so much more progress to be made. where do they stand economically? >> there's still a lot of problems. there's de facto segregation, economic problems, educational problems that south africa needs to advance on in order to realize the society that nelson mandela had in mind for south africa. i got to tell you, being in south africa, the folks there, from all different colors, all different backgrounds, all different socio-economic levels, they're talking about these things and really feel like together they will be able to do so much more. >> abc's lana zak, thank you so much. >> the coverage of nelson mandela's life and death does not end here. see how his story influenced pop culture and moviemakers later in this half-hour. >>> another major headline this morning, the investigation into the shooting of an american teacher in libya. ronnie smith gunned down while jogging at a u.s. consulate in benghazi. his murder comes days after al qaeda called for libyan attacks on u.s. interests. smith's wife and son returned to the u.s. for the holidays. he was set to join them next week. >>> a wicked storm slamming the nation this morning is far from over. a treacherous mix of snow and sleet crippling the south central u.s., blanketing arkansas, oklahoma and tennessee. here's abc's clayton sandell. >> reporter: temperatures are dropping and blood pressure's rising as a major winter storm barrels east. minnesota, a mess of spinning tires and plows. the state digging out from under heavy snow. oklahoma grocery stores are selling out. >> i wanted to beat the rush. i didn't. >> reporter: tennessee declared a state of emergency. further west, it's the frigid cold. oklahoma city chillier than anchorage, alaska. this oregon mill was coated in ice. in california, growers are burning peach pits for enough heat to save a $2 billion citrus crop. >> we have to protect it at all costs. >> reporter: in denver, they are de-icing planes and trying to find shelter for the homeless. >> these sorts of nights don't happen a lot but it is dangerous. >> reporter: staying warm means piling on the layers. >> i've got this coat and then a sweater and long-sleeve shirt and thermal underwear under that. >> reporter: denver tied a chilly record at minus 15 degrees. at tom's urban restaurant. >> this is our walk-in cooler this is 35, 38 degrees. it's actually warmer in the freezer. >> two degrees. >> that is 17 degrees warmer than outside. >> this is where we warm up. >> reporter: and now criminals are taking advantage of the cold looking for puffers. what's a puffer? it is a car that an owner leaves running unattended so they can warm it up. police say they have had a half dozen puffer cars stolen. clayton sandell, abc news, denver. >> from the ice storm in the mid south to the brutal cold in the upper midwest the storm is dangerous. >> meteorologist jim dickey is tracking it all at accu-weather. good morning, jim. >> good morning, john and diana. once again, a brutally cold air mass has set up across the northern plains the rockies to the upper midwest. these are expected early morning temperatures. minus 4 in minneapolis. minus 15 in pierre and minus 12 in denver. as this cold moves to the east, we continue to see snow, ice and rain from texas, north and east to the ohio valley and significant ice in some locations. that includes much of arkansas, including little rock area. big-time impacts. looking for dangerous road conditions, especially through the morning commute along with power outages and it could be days before power is restored. along with that, three to six inches of snow spreading to the ohio valley and the northeast. john, diana, back to you. >> thank you very much. >>> coming up we return to our top story in returning nelson mandela's humble roots. >> and hear how his profound words will resonate in the history books. this is a special edition of "world news now." ♪ prove it. enough is enough. d-con baits are specially formulated to kill in one feeding. guaranteed. d-con. get out. gives you a long-lasting fresh breath feeling. so you have the courage to jump in... go in for the hug... or make sparks fly. for a fresh breath feeling that lasts up to 5x longer, get scope outlast. ♪ >>> welcome back. it is not an understatement to say that nelson mandela's time on earth literally changed the world. >> abc's terry moran has more on mandela's life and legacy. >> reporter: mandela was born in 1918 into the royal family of the thembu people, but he grew up under apartheid racial segregation and oppression. the white minority ruled south africa. it is hard to imagine the pure evil of that system. abject poverty for blacks and severe restrictions on travel, education and employment. whites enjoyed all of the powers and riches in this rich country. his tribal name meant troublemaker. perhaps it was his destiny, particularly after the massacre in 1960 when he and the african national congress took up armed struggle. >> there are many people who feel it is useless and futile for us to talk about peace and nonviolence against a government who is using savage attacks on unarmed defenseless people. >> reporter: mandela was a born leader. so in 1964 the apartheid government tried him for treason and sought the death penalty. his opening statement to the court electrified the country. >> i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society. it is an ideal for which i hope to live for and see realized. but my lord, if it needs be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die. >> reporter: mandela was sentenced to life in prison and sent to the notorious robben island prison, and he was not heard from for nearly 30 years. and then in 1990, the south african government, under increasing pressure and isolated in the world, suddenly yielded. >> mr. nelson mandela will be released at the staff prison. >> reporter: it was an amazing moment when mandela walked out of prison. on february 11th, 1990. the world rejoiced. he worked with his former enemy to move toward free elections and the end of apartheid. he and frederik willem de klerk were jointly awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993 and the following year this, the world again looked on in wonder and joy as millions of black south africans lined up to vote for the first time. nelson mandela was elected president in a landslide. >> so help me god. >> reporter: a few months later at his inauguration attended by scores of world leaders, he declared a new era for his beloved country. >> never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: terry moran, abc news. >> now what happens next is nelson mandela's body has already been moved to the hospital. he will be given a state funeral. not only that, but all of the flags will be at half staff until the funeral is over. there's a ten-day mourning period for south africans, which obviously starts now. >> just amazing. it's a life that goes beyond anything a book or hollywood could ever make up. truly epic life from an epic man. >> nelson mandela inspired acts of revolution and kindness. his life moved artists to capture his spirit. >> up next, the movies inspired by mandela and how hollywood is reacting to his death. you are watching "world news now." ♪ >> announcer: "world news now" continues after this from our abc stations. ♪ >> announcer: "world news now" continues after this from our abc stations. >>> nelson mandela had a profound global impact. not just in the world of politics but in nearly every facet of modern culture. >> the at least of which was the world of entertainment. mandela was the inspiration for a number of movies. some blockbusters and others controversial. screen legend, sydney poitier, starred alongside michael caine. a look at the events leading up to mandela's release from prison in '90 after 27 years of incarceration. he won an oscar for his portrayal in the sports drama "invictus," chronicled the events after the rugby world cup hosted in that country following the dismantling of apartheid. >> and just this year, mandela played by idris elba in "mandela walk to freedom." it chronicled his life journey from childhood in a rural village through his inauguration as the first democratically elected president of south korea. >> mandela has a single acting credit to his name, appearing in the 1992 spike lee film "malcolm x." he was a schoolteacher reciting the lines from malcolm x's speech by any means necessary. an interesting side note. mandela told spike lee he would not say the words "by any means necessary." >>> world leaders, celebrities, and everyday people honoring mandela by sharing their thoughts on social media. >> mandela had deep ties to hollywood. spike lee with mandela in this picture about malcolm x shared this picture on instagram. you can see mandela wearing the "x" baseball cap there. >> anderson cooper said i remember soweto election day 1994. standing in line with elderly south african voters for the first time in their lives. >> mike tyson tweeted out a picture of himself and nelson mandela. tyson noted he heard about mandela's death while on african soil in algeria. tyson wrote sending prayers to nelson mandela's family. >>> charlize theron said, your impact on the world will live forever. adding there will never be words to say what i am feeling now. i'm saddened to the depths of my soul truly. >> obviously these go on and on. this from beyonce, who had an opportunity to meet mandela and she instagramed this picture of herself, her husband, jay-z and mandela's wife saying god bless. >> fergie sharing a picture of herself with nelson mandela. saying, "meeting nelson mandela at his house in johannesburg was a truly memorable moment in life for me. he was an angel." >>> and as we pay tribute to nelson mandela, a celebration of his life. >> truly. these artists are coming out more and more throughout the entire day we get updates via e-mail of who was tweeting out next. presidents tweeting out and not only the people who are in hollywood. of course we leave you with one example of the way his life inspired artists everywhere. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> if you are like us, your facebook and twitter feeds are filling up with quotesnelson >>> if you are like us, your facebook and twitter feeds are filling up with quotes by nelson mandela. >> his words inspired justice in his own nation and the better part of the last century they moved men and women just about everywhere. here's nelson mandela in his own words. >> south africa is a -- there's room for all the various races in this country. to spend 27 years at the prime of your life is a tragedy. i regret those years that i have wasted in prison. let each one of you and all of our people give the enemies of peace and liberty. those faced to take us back to apartheid. south africa has to eliminate racial hatred and suspicion caused and offer equality to all of its citizens of peace, security and prosperity. >> together, we must pledge to continue our united effort for the abolition of the apartheid system. we are here because you took the humane decision that you could not ignore the inhumanity represented by the apartheid system. >> never doubted in our mind. even as we celebrate, let us remind ourselves that our work is far from complete. where there is poverty and sickness, including aids, where humans are being oppressed, there's more work to be done. >> i have completely retired. i've left office. i have lost influence. i'm now a has-been. don't call me. i'll call you. ♪ i'm now a has-been. don't call me. i'll call you. ♪ this is your computer. let's go on the internet. let's go. ok. she's going to love me all over again now. jamaica, here you come! here we go. ha ha! good job. all right. >>> this morning on "world news now," remembering nelson mandela. the tributes worldwide as the nation prepares for ten days of memorials. >> celebrity tributes, oprah winfrey remembers hosting mandela on her talk show, her fond memories and the laughs they shared. >>> condolences from bill clinton to spike lee. social media lights up as the famous and not so famous share their thoughts. >>> the storm warnings across the middle of the nation as ice and snow, extreme arctic cold make for a miserable morning. it is friday, december 6th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now" with john muller and diana perez. >> we begin with the death of a man who changed the world, former south african president nelson mandela passing away at the age of 95. >> there's mourning and respectful celebration at every corner of the globe as millions honor mandela's legacy. his fight for racial equality landed him in prison for nearly three decades. he emerged undeterred and unbroken. abc's alexander marquardt has more. >> reporter: south africa has entered a period of national mourning. profound sadness at the loss of a man many affectionately knew as tata madiba. his death was announced by jacob zuma, who called mandela south africa's greatest son. the celebration has been remarkable. people of all stripes taking to the streets, singing, dancing and celebrating his life. his death came as no surprise but as a new day dawns in south africa many are waking up with a deep sense of loss over this national and global hero. alexander marquardt, abc news, johannesburg. >> alex, thank you. >>> president obama called himself one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela. he ordered flags at the white house and across the country to be lowered to half staff. karen travers has reaction from around the world. ♪ >> reporter: outside of the home where nelson mandela died, they sang in memory and mourning. >> great fighter, strong man. >> reporter: south africa's president delivered the long dreaded news. >> our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost their father. >> reporter: president obama praised the man he called a personal inspiration. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. >> reporter: that sense of historical loss ranged from royalty. >> extremely sad and tragic news. we are reminded what an extraordinary and inspiring man nelson mandela was. >> reporter: to regular people. >> is there a man who has more people aware of what he has contributed? >> reporter:. >> reporter: as a young man, nelson mandela faced daily humiliation of living under apartheid a system of government enforced racial division that lead to the oppression of the majority, black south africa mandela made th his people's liberation his cause. in 19he pric pr19he pric "free mandela" became synonymous with demands for a free south after three decades, president derelea. >> in the name of peace, democracy and freedom for all. >> reporter: he was embraced by his people and the world. mandela became a no prize recipient and ed president in the country's first free election. millions are mourning nelson mandela. he was a symbol of freedom and the strength of the human spirit in south africa and beyond. john and diana. >> in the 27 years he was incarcerated, he organized protests and got his law degree and even though he was only allowed one visitor a year and write or receive one letter every six months. so he had little contact with his own family. >> amazing. he won over everybody in that 30 years of incarceration, winning over prison guards, walking out and renouncing fierce of hatred. he said it only clouds the mind. this is a man as soon as he walked out embraced anyone who oppressed him and what a remarkable thing. he was raised as a son of a tribal leader. his nickname was troublemaker. isn't that amazing? little did they know? he certainly was. >> yes. >>> oprah winfrey's also weighing in on mandela's passing. she says it was one of her greatest honors to be invited to his home. and called him humble, graceful and heroic. she called him a gift to us all, and she hosted mandela on her show 13 years ago. >> i had said that you are one of the most -- the most humble person i ever met. i will tell you, when mr. mandela arrived today, he said to our producer, "what is the subject of today's show?" [ applause ] >> and she said, "nelson mandela. you are the subject of today's show." and he goes, "oh, all right." >> winfrey also credits mandela as the inspiration for her school for girls in south africa. our coverage of nelson mandela's life and death continues later this half-hour as we hear from mandela's jailer who describes their unusual and long-lasting friendship. you want to keep it here on abc news all morning long. >>> all right. we will turn to other major headlines beginning with something of a reversal by the white house involving the president's uncle who had been facing deportation from the u.s. now originally the administration had said that never met. wite y pad t three weeks while attending law school. it came after the judge ruled he could stay ignoring a deportation order two decades ago. >>> libyan government says so far no one claimed responsibility for shooting an american teacher to death as he jogged through the streets of benghazi. despite threats to americans in libya, he chose to stay and teach high school chemistry. his wife and son had come home to texas for the holidays and he planned to join them next week. >>> hang on tight for this one. that is what everyone on the boeing 747 was doing. check out that emirates airlines jumbo jet trying to land in strong winds yesterday in birmingham, england. it attempted to ground two times and failed both times. eventually the plane had to be flown to london where it landed there instead. one passenger tweeted out never flying again. >>> florida state quarterback jameis winston will not be charged with sexually assaulting a woman. a prosecutor says he will not pursue the case because there were too many gaps in his accuser's story. the prosecutor said there wasn't enough evidence to win a conviction. winston will lead the seminoles in the acc title game tomorrow night and he is a leading candidate for the heisman trophy. >>> much of the u.s. is in the grips of bitterly frigid conditions. a storm spreading record amounts of snow, ice and cold. arkansas is one of the many states where ice warnings will be in effect all day. roads are virtually impassable. thousands without power. abc's brandi hitt has more on the big chill. >> reporter: as one area of the country tries digging out from under several feet of snow. >> doing our best trying to clear the roads right now. >> reporter: the south and midwest are bracing for the blast of bone-chilling temperatures. you are looking at the threat of ice over the next 48 hours from dallas to cincinnati. this truck in arkansas is one of many that have been sliding out of control on the icy roads. >> we already have our equipment and manpower strategically placed throughout the district. >> families in oklahoma and texas are stocking up on food and supplies after witnessing what their neighbors to the north have experienced the last several days. >> kind of chilly out here. only supposed to get colder. >> reporter: in denver, airport crews are busy de-icing planes. out west, citrus growers are fighting freezing conditions overnight with their wind machines. while furnace repairmen also work around the clock. >> couldn't have been much more than 40 last night and space heaters only go so far. >> reporter: and it's going to be an icy run at the dallas marathon this weekend with temperatures expected in the 30s. marathon officials say it will go on as planned unless conditions are deemed unsafe. >> thank you. >>> in oklahoma city, conditions are so dangerous people are urged to stay home today unless it is absolutely necessary to go outside. our coverage is continuing at accu-weather with meteorologist jim dickey has dire predictions. good morning, jim. >> good morning, john and diana. we continue to deal with extreme cold here in the midwest, northern plains and rockies. these are early morning temperatures, not windchill values. minus four minneapolis. minus 15 pierre, minus 12 in denver. last night denver fell to minus 15 that tied the record for the day. as it moves south and east relative warmth. as the two collide seeing heavy rain, snow and in the middle freezing rain. we have a layer of warmth in the middle of the atmosphere. snow falls into that, melts at the surface and falls to ice, encasing roadways and trees and power lines. power outages are likely here. it could be days before power is restored. back to you. >> thank you. >>> here's a look at the rest of the weather. a wintry mix for the northeast. clear and mild in southern georgia and florida. sunny across the southwest but the next storm is hitting the west coast an that will bring snow to oregon and california. >> mild in the northeast, warmer as you go further south. high teens in and 20s. and the west coast shivering from the 30s to the 50s. >> coming up, we return to the top story. nelson mandela's push for change. >> his influence on world leaders and everyday people. you are watching "world news now." ♪ world news now." you are watching "world news now." a now." are watching "world news now." are watching "world news w." ♪ snooets fasten your seatbelts everybody. 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"president mandela was one of the great forces for freedom and equality of our time. he bore his burdens with dignity and grace, and our world is better off because of his example." it is a type of worldwide experience that draws young and old, black and white to share feelings. south african native charlize theron, "my thoughts and love to nelson mandela's family. rest in peace madiba. you will be missed but your impact on this world will live forever." director spike lee posted this simple message. and then this one from nasa, intergalactic message. from the space shuttle. the space shuttle posting a picture of mandela's beloved south africa. and crowds continue to gather in front of mandela's home, perhaps the day's most poignant message from mandela's own twitter account. death is inevitable. when a man has done what he considers to be a duty to his people and his country, he can rest in peace. a virtual memorial on social media. electronic good-byes for the man who brought the world together. jim avila, abc news, new york. >> great one that came in from the dalai lama. another man of incredible moral authority, and he says, "he was a man of courage, principle, and unquestionable integrity. a great human being. someone who we can truly say lived amainingful life. >> we heard from so many people but from president obama also. he said not only obviously that we have to remember him but he said he's gone home and we lost one of the most influential, courageous human beings that any of us will share time on this earth with. that's pretty powerful. >> the president's words were great. he said he no longer belongs to us now. he longs to the ages. >> very true. by the way, so now what happens is there is this ten-day memorial process. "the guardian" is reporting this is going to be an epic time. >> rival john paul ii's -- >> in 2005, his funeral. >> it will come to a stand still. the country can't function. there will be organized and impromptu memorials. which are happening. there you see that. that is johannesburg, south africa. that is happening live right now. this thing will happen throughout the ten days and beyond then. >> all right. we'll be right back. >> announcer: "world news now" continues after this the from our abc stations. ♪ >>> the pride in everybody's face when they take a picture with that man. nelson mandela lived the kind of life that few on this planet will ever achieve. robin roberts looks back at his inconquerable spirit. >> reporter: nelson mandela, a leader who inspired a nation's hope. >> both black and white will be able to walk tall. >> reporter: forgive. >> at peace with itself and the world. ♪ >> reporter: his tribal name given at birth means troublemaker. but on the first day of school, his teacher gave him a new name. >> you must have a christian name, and i said no, i don't have one. and he said from today you are going to be nelson. >> he was a boxer who became a lawyer and a leading voice in the african national congress the amc. struggling to end apartheid. white ruled the viciously enforced policy of racial segregation. but in 1960, after police shot and killed 69 protesters, the amc, which had always been nonviolent, created a military wing under mandela's command. mandela was imprisoned in 1962. two years later sentenced to life in prison accused to working to overthrow the government. in court, on trial for his life, he said this. >> i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society. it is an ideal for which i hope to live for and to see realized. but, my lord, if it needs be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die. >> reporter: four miles off of capetown, south africa, on robben island, mandela spent 27 years cut off from the world but not forgotten. released at the age of 72 in '90 he remained ever vigilant that his country and its freedoms rested in the hands of its people. >> the majority of south africa
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 2:35am EST
the inspiration for her school for girls in south africa. our coverage of nelson mandela's life and death continues later this half hour as we hear from mandela's jailer who describes their unusual and long-lasting friendship. you want to keep it here on abc news all morning long. >>> all right. we will turn to other major headlines beginning with something of a reversal by the white house involving the president's uncle who had been facing deportation from the u.s. omar and the president had never met but they said he lived with him three weeks while attending law school. it came after the judge ruled he could stay ignoring a deportationing order two decades ago. >>> libyan government says so far no one claimed responsibility for shooting an american teacher to death as he jogged through the streets of benghazi. despite threats. he chose to stay and teach high school chemistry. his wife and son had come home to texas for the holidays and he planned to join them next week. >>> check out that emirates airlines jumbo jet trying to land in strong winds yesterday in birmingham, england.
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 6:00am PST
special edition of "cnn newsroom" as we remember the life and legacy of nelson mandela. first breaking news in the last hour, brand new jobs report is out with the lowest unemployment rate in five years. we'll tell you how the markets and the white house are responding this morning. >>> also an arctic blast, this is dallas, where the mercury has dropped 50 degrees in just the last 24 hours. colossal ice storm putting on the freeze from texas to tennessee. and in johannesburg, remembering the man who went from prisoner to president, we'll have the latest on funeral plans for the anti-apartheid icon, nelson mandela. >>> first to that breaking news on the economy, americans are getting back to work, 203,000 jobs were added to payrolls in november, and the unemployment rate ticked two notches lower to 7%. that's the lowest unemployment rate in five years. our chief business correspondent christine romans is here to break down the numbers. better than expected, so should we feel absolutely completely good about this? >> i saw some broad-based strength in these numbers from warehous
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 9:00pm PST
people. at the time nelson mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc opposing apartheid had been organized as non-violent resistance. but after sharpville, they decided maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville they decided they would form a paramilitary wing and nelson man delg la was one of the anc leaders who went undergroutd to help it. they would target infrastructure and try to sabotage the state. after sharpville the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the a nchnc. they made it illegal to be a part of that group. nelson mandela was arrested in 1961, again in 1962 and convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on robben island. while he was already serving that sentence they put him on trial again, this time for sabotage. and they convicted him, and they sentenced him to life in prison, to life on robben island. so in 1964 he began a new sentence that was a life sentence, and for the first 18 years of it his cell on robbe
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 6:30am PST
generations. nelson mandela has died after a long battle with the recurring not long in the us at the age of ninety five. thank you so much for joining us for fools think i'm only home this friday people around the world are paying their respects to nelson mandela the ninety five year old died thursday evening at his home in johannesburg was battling a reoccurring a long illness. mandela had been receiving intensive care at his home in this friday everyone from heads of state to people on the street are remembering mandela was both inspirational and controversial. kyle brown takes a look back now the life of the us mandela when the former trend state eritrean july eighteen nineteen eighteen. nelson mandela was meant to become a tribal chief. just like his father. instead he became an aliya in the first thought legal practice in johannesburg. he joined the african national congress korean sea in nineteen forty four. apartheid was introduced for use later. his practice monday that was exposed to the new manatees of apartheid on that day basis. and he decided to fly back to the norm finances
Univision
Dec 5, 2013 6:30pm PST
ellos es nelson mandela, hablar de nelson mandela es hablar de unas de las personas más importantes, es que él vencio el racismo, paz en la tumba de un hombre ejemplar. >> desde muy joven se distinguio por sus ideas diferentes, renunció al derecho hereditario, nelson mandela obtuvo su título de abogado en 1942, dos años más tarde entró a un movimiento de lucha contra la opresión de negros africanos, en 1948 llegó al poder de sudáfrica un partido que propugnaba la segregación, en 1962 fue arrestado con 150 compañeros y condenados a cadena perpetua y estuvo 27 años en prisión, mandela lideró a su partido en las negociaciones para conseguir una democracia, en las primeras elecciones democráticas nelson mandela ganó la presidencia, en su país era conocido como madiva, recibió más de 250 premios y reconocimientos internacionales entre cuadro décadas e incluso el pnp premio nóbel de la paz. >> también logró una reconciliacion entre los distintos grupos étnicos. >> una de sus últimas intervenciones fue en el mundial de sudáfrica. >> nelson mandela es uno de los pe
NBC
Dec 5, 2013 11:00pm EST
>>> tonight, the world is reacting to the death of nelson mandela. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> millions are gathering to celebrate his life and legacy. >> like a grandfather, you know. he's the father of the nation. >> for my generation, he's a leader we've all looked up to. >> good evening. he was a former boxer who would spend most of his long life fighting for freedom, renouncing violence and fighting for sgrus just. nelson mandela would become one of the world east most iconic figures. >> he was later elected president of south africa. he died today at the age of 95, but his legacy lives on. at howard university dozens gathered for a candle light vigil in his memory. outside of northwest d.c. tonight, people are leaving flowers and talking about his impact. president obama called mandela one of the most influential, a courageous and profoundly good men that ever lived. >> i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison, it gave me a sense of whatans ca they're guided by their hopes and not by their fears. >> to honor
NBC
Dec 6, 2013 4:00am EST
as news spreads of nelson mandela's death. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with o this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> this morning we'll take you to south africa and look at the man who spent so much of his life behind bars, yet his words and actions continue to have a profound impact around the world. >>> and in other news, much of the u.s. braces for a major winter storm with snow, ice and plunging temperatures cutting across the country. "early today" starts right now. >>> good morning. i'm mara schiavocampo. he's being remembered as a man who changed the world. nelson mandela being mourned around the globe today. from a small prison cell, he rallied a nation. his long walk to freedom inspired hope in millions and his humility helped to revolutionize south africa. >> his tire rsless struggle for freedom and the respect of the world. >> his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> we sho
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 12:00am PST
, and in 1990, after 27 years in a cell, nelson mandela was released. four years later, voters of south africa, black and white, would go to the polls in if first democratic election in that country, and elect mandela their president with 62% of the vote. mandela set about what to do what seemed to be an impossible task, stitching together these two people, one oppressed, degraded for years, the other a minority, fearing they would be completely disempowered. in his inaugural speech, mandela stressed it would not be that way. >> and i enter a covenant to build a society in which all south africans, both black and white, will be able to walk tall without any fear in their hearts. a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> mandela would transfer power after a five-year term and live to become the founder of a new nation, the living embodiment of its highest aspirations. joining me now is rohid. i cannot imagine the mood in south africa at this moment. >> it's a strange mood and it's very early in the morning here. so it's difficult to gauge the mood across the country.
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 2:30pm PST
. crowds take to the streets in so weto to remember their former leader. example nelson mandela has left for the rest of us to follow. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. since last night when the world learned of the death of former south african leader nelson mandela, the tributes have been flooding in. we learned from president jacob zuma that mandela will be given a full state funeral on sunday, december 15. the white house has confirmed president obama and the first lady will travel to south africa next week to take part in memorial services. we will have full coverage and area begin in johannesburg -- johannesburg. >> they come from all walks of life and all communities to pay respects outside the home of nelson mandela. the sense of bereavement is palpable. to some, almost private and personal. together,so a coming a nation united in mourning but also in celebration of the life of the man they call madiba. >> people are celebrating the life of nelson mandela. i think he would want us to celebrate his life. >> we kept holding onto that
CBS
Dec 5, 2013 5:30pm PST
. >> pelley: late today we learned of the death of nelson mandela, the man who lead south africa from apartheid to a multiracial democracy. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> pelley: from johannesburg. an american is gunned down in benghazi, libya. was it terrorism, bob orr is covering. snow, ice and bitter cold stretch across half the nation. manual bojorquez on what it is hitting and where it is going. and the special bond between two presidents. we'll talk to bill clinton about his friend nelson mandela. >> we could have had the politics of resentment. he chose the politics of inclusion. se the politics of captioning sponsored by cbs ptioning sponsored this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. with s >> pelley: good evening. he changed the world. you can't say that about many people. but you can say that about nelson mandela. the man who lead south africa's peaceful transition out of apartheid and became the country's first black president. he died today at the age of 95. mandela had been battling a lung infection for many months. right after its offi
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 1:00am PST
from around the world. stay ahead on cnn. . >>> remembering nelson mandela. the world mourning the loss of a legend morning. the south african president hailed for his courage, his conviction, his decency. i'm john berman. >> i'm michaela pereira. we welcome our viewers in the u.s. and arnold the world. >> this is a special edition of "early start" beginning this morning because the world is grieving and, in some ways, celebrating a giant among men. nelson mandela whose unbreakable will and unsurpassed courage brought an end to an era of white domination in south africa. he is dead this morning at the age of 95. mandela was such a global icon with larger than life legend who went from a prison cell to the presidency and he did it with such unmashed grace. i want to bring in arwa damon when is live in johannesburg in south africa. >> reporter: nelson mandela a hero, a legend, an icon. so many of the people we are speaking to here will say that hardly truly encompasses what it was that he meant for this nation and what it was that he allowed this nation to become. behind me is the ho
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 2:30am PST
am prepared to die. >> nelson mandela, lived to see a free democracy in south africa. this morning, his passing at age 95 means different things to people in different generations, from starting out as a lawyer and man of action to political prisoner to symbol to historic leader, to an icon and living legend. we will not only honor mandela but put him in historical perspective on this friday edition of "way too early." goo shaqman on this december 6th. we begin with nelson mandela. it would have been ground breaking enough to become south africa's first black president, but he was so much more not only to his own country but all over the world. the long-time freedom fighter has died at the age of 95. madiba as he was known sacrificed decades of his own life in prison in an effort to win his countrymen freedom from the bonds of apartheid. mourning and tributes as you might imagine pouring in throughout the night from harlem to his hometown of johannesburg, south africa. it is all for a man who was prepared, as you heard, to die to bring democracy to a country where for so long it wa
ABC
Dec 5, 2013 5:30pm PST
for watching. we appreciate your ♪ >>> this is "world news." tonight nelson mandela, his struggle and strength healed a nation and changed a world. >> i stand here before you not as a prophet but as a humble servant. >> from a tiny prison cell, he rallied millions against racism and injustice. his long walk to freedom a beacon of hope for generations. >> nothing will stop our date with destiny. >> tonight, the world mourns the passing of an icon. >>> and a good evening to al you. we welcome you to a special edition of "world news," beginning with breaking news. a titan of the century has died. nelson mandela, the man who taught the modern world you can transform anger into hope. he was 95 and it's not that his death was a surprise but his life continues to astonish us in a master class in living the possibility of a better world. he spent 27 years in prison for his belief in freedom, equality and emerged with a message of generosity toward his oppressors. we have reaction from around the world tonight. first "good morning america" anger robin roberts who has traveled to south afri
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am PST
today. >>> good morning. i'm chris jansing. this morning we remember nelson mandela. in life he united south africa and the world and his legacy as a fighter for freedom will continue to resonate well after his death. icon, legend, hero. none of those words seem quite big enough to describe a man who changed the world. ♪ and yet in the streets of johannesburg, the crowds are celebratory. south africa planning ten days of mourning. mandela's body will lie in state with leaders from all over the world expected to pay respects. here in the united states, flags are flying at half staff. mandela had a huge impact on president obama inspiring him to public service. the two only met once in 2005 when president obama was then senator obama. >> i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> mandela spent 27 years behind bars for treason, for backing an anti-apartheid charter. he was finally released february 11, 1990.
NBC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
>> announcer: the >>> the death of nelson >>> the death of nelson mandela. this is nbc nightly news with brian williams. we're back with more of our special coverage of the passing of nelson mandela who died today at the age of 95. as you might imagine, at this hour, reaction to his loss, is pouring in from around the world and the nation of south africa now begins a state of mourning. our south african-based correspondent is with us from outside the mandela family home in johannesburg. as we said in our first half hour, this is a nation many of whom went to bed last night who will be waking up tomorrow morning to hear this anticipated but still sad and shocking news. >> absolutely right, brian. anticipated. expected. predictable but painful nonetheless. as i look around, the crowds here have grown to maybe 400 or 500 people. mainly south africans who were born after the birth of democracy. the so-called born frees who have no memory of the darkest years of ar par tide. they are singing and celebrating his life rather than mourning his death because, of course, his death was not in
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 3:00am PST
leader and freedom fighter nelson mandela. >> here in the u.s. we're tracking a dangerous ice storm. forecasters saying it could be the worst ice storm ever for the region. people are waking up without power but millions could end up losing electricity for weeks, they fear, this as temperatures continue to plummet. >> we'll continue to what's going on but we want to react to the passing of nelson mandela. here's a live look at the crowds that have been gathered outside the late south african leader's home. they're singing, their dancing, nations, of course, showing their respect. flags around the world at the white house we'll show you, see it, half-staff. this morning, honoring the anti-apartheid leader's life and legacy. we'll follow the developments from every corner of the world. let's bring with robyn curnow. she's in johannesburg. >> the news came just before midnight south african time that nelson mandela had gone. so many south africans woke up to this stark, gut wrenching head line. this says "hamba kahle madiba." >> it was an announcement heard around the world. >> our bel
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 11:00am PST
nelson mandela referred to and wanted his country to be behind you. tell me a little bit more about what we're hearing regarding the next few days and how this country, this world will pay its respects. >> lots of great stories. i think the plans have been in place for a while. they are really spread throughout south africa. we have that big gathering on tuesday that will be a memorial service in the stadium and holds tens and thousands of people. that will be an outpouring. and a number of world leaders are expected to attend that and not only the state funeral that will be on the 15th but even prior to the memorial service on tuesday, the president announced this coming sunday will be a day of prayer and people are encouraged to do things in their own homes. there's just something about this story that has extended over. decades that makes people want to go outside and just hang out here really. people haven't been staying all day. it's not one of those things that gathers too many people and then becomes unruly. it's that people want to show up and pass through and put some flowe
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
massacre at sharpville killed 69 people. at the time, nelson mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc and the other major organizations opposing apartheid in south africa had been organized as nonviolent movements, nonviolent resistance, and nonviolent organizing. but after sharpville, they decided that maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville, they decided they would form a paramilitary wing, and nelson mandela was one of the anc leader who is went underground to help start it. they said they would target government buildings and strategic infrastructure and they would try to sabotage the state. after sharpville, the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the anc. they made it illegal to be a member of that group. nelson mandela was arrested for treason in 1961, he was acquitted and he was convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on south africa's version of alcatraz, which is robin island. while he was already serving that
CBS
Dec 6, 2013 4:00am EST
. for more information on teen safety, visit teensdrivesmart.com. >>> remembering nelson mandela. the anti-apartied activist dies at 95. this morning he's being remembered as an icon of human rights. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. captioning funded by cbs >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for friday, december 6th, 2013. good morning. good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. well, this morning nelson mandela is being remembered for his resolve and ability to forgive, traits that helped peace employ end the brutal segregational policy in south africa. he died yesterday at the age of 95 following a long illness. he was surrounded by his family. his fight made him an inspiration to millions, including president obama. >> i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison, he gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided by their hopes and not by their fears. >> when mandela died, crowds gathered throughout south africa to mourn his death andelebrate his life. debora patta is in johannesburg with the latest. good morni
ABC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
are remembering nelson mandela, a man who changed this world. president obama saying just hours ago he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. at 95, his death not a surprise, but the lessons of his life still reverbrating around the globe, that long walk to freedom, brimming with humility, resilient, a determination to forgive. and there has been a huge outpouring of emotion, reaction from around the world tonight, our team there starting with abc's chief foreign correspondent terry moran who joins us right now from london. terry? >> reporter: it is a profound moment for south africa and really for the world, the marking of the passing of this remarkable man and of the end of an era in human grace and dignity. in south africa itself, in the neighborhood which was a segregated township where nelson mandela lived before he went to prison for 27 years and where he went home to. there is a combination of mourning, of sorrow and celebration and gratitude, people gathering outside of his home and dancing, celebrating the life of nelson mandela. reaction pouring in from around the w
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am PST
. ♪ >>> and this morning, the world celebrates the life of nelson mandela. >> we have never doubted in our mind, even during the darkest hours of our struggle, that eventually we would win. >> he calls himself an ordinary man who became a leader because of extraordinary circumstances. >> sometimes it's calls for a nation to be great. let your greatness blossom. >> this morning, his life, his legacy. >> as long as injustice exists in our world, none of us can truly rest. >> we talk to the people whose lives he touched. this is a special edition of "good morning america," remembering nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >>> we do say good morning, everyone. and we are celebrating the life of one of the most remarkable men in history. he has been called the apostle of reconciliation. a leader who inspired so many, with his own fight for freedom and justice for all. we have so many pictures that we're going to share with you. this, outside of his home in south africa. crowds gathering all around the world. tributes pouring in from around the globe this morning. >> 95 years old. a monum
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 7:30pm EST
>> we 11ed just a few hours ago that nelson mandela had passed away. the at the time is still a shock, and it is a great shock. >> thank you for having us, and i want to send out condolences on behalf of the family. where condolences to the family, and also to the people of south africa. the biggest thoughts are trucage, humility, somebody's great vision, passion, for life. and they are not saying any minute to do good. i apologize for not calling it the right time, trance africa. what was it like to meet him? >> oh, everything that was more than -- and i knew it would be anxious, and excited and dealing with -- more tremendous then i have half. a meeting with him. and just anything that is said about him, even after the meeting you just multiply it even more. the man is a great leader, but with humility, somebody who was able to bring together many many different people together. >> also being able to articulate his prince. s. his passions. but at the sate time, being able to emphasize with others. and it takes this tremendous person to do that. so everything people are saying
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 2:00am PST
. >> incredible to see. "early start" continues right now. >>> remembering nelson mandela. this morning the world remembering that man, mourning the loss of a legend. south africa's former president hailed for his courage and decency and message of equality. welcome to "early start." i'm john berman. >> i'm michaela pereira. it is 5:00 in the east. >>> nelson mandela whose unbreakable will and unsurpassed courage brought an end to an era of white domination in south africa. he is dead this morning at the age of 95. mandela was such a global icon with larger than life legend who went from a prison cell to the presidency and he did it with such unmashed grace. i want to bring in robin curnow live from johannesburg. set the scene for us today, robin. >> the announcement was made just before midnight on thursday. so many south africans didn't really know that their icon had passed on. it was only when they woke up this morning that they perhaps looked at the newspapers or heard on the radio. much of this country is quite rule countryside and they would have seen headlines like this.
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 9:00pm EST
the wrights. joining us here in the studio, she helped to organize nelson mandela's first tour after he was released from prison, and it was really quite soon after his release, can you take us back to that moment? it is june of 1990, and america is seeing nelson mandela, how emotional was it here? >> it was really pan polonium. it was. i remember when the mayor described him as the modern day black moses, and i think that for me, being part of the first national u.s. tour, i felt like i got a chance to see america at its best, because new york in particular went crazy. >> there were thousands of people in the streets. >> there were an estimated hundreds of thousands of people. from his first appearance in brooklyn, to the motor kade, with cuomo down broadway. people were crying. >> there were people with bannering saying irish for mandela, everybody in their offices were out, it was just an amazing and exhilarating moment. and i think that the whole idea of mandela, obviously he is part of a lineage, not just in south africa, but in terms of the anti-clonian independent movement, in
FOX
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
area. >>> former south african president nelson mandela has passed away. but instead of tears tonight there is rejoicing and singing. [ singing ] >> right now you are looking at live pictures from south africa where a crowd gathered outside nelson mandela's home. he led south africa out of apartheid and became a statesman. president obama said nelson mandela was an inspiration guided by love and not hate. >> for now let us pause and give thanks to the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands. and bent the arc of the moral universe towards justice. >> nelson mandela visited oakland in 1990s months after he was released in prison. he spent 27 years in a jail cell. ktvu's rob roth is live in oakland with a look at his lasting impression. rob? >> reporter: a sculpture of nelson mandela sits here in oakland. people we spoke with say he leave as legacy of peace and integrity. [ singing ] >> reporter: when nelson mandela appeared a thet oakland coliseum in 1990 -- at the oakland coliseum in 1990. he knew nelson mandela and pictured with him moments before nelson ma
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